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Posts Tagged ‘physiology

“Count your blessings, but count your calories too”*…

 

We’re skating into that time year…  the onslaught of celebratory meals and Holiday parties that promise to test our waistbands.  But help– or at least a nagging caution– is at hand.  The app Calorific uses simple, pastel images to reveal how much of virtually any food adds up to 200 calories.

From God’s condiment…

…to rabbit food…

More at “What 200 Calories of Every Food Looks Like.”

* Erma Bombeck

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As we go down for the count, we might send well-digested birthday greetings to William Beaumont; he was born on this date in 1785.  An American army surgeon, Beaumont was the first person to observe and study human digestion as it occurs in the stomach.  As a young medic stationed on Mackinac Island in Michigan, Beaumont was asked to treat a shotgun wound “more than the size of the palm of a man’s hand” (as Beaumont wrote).  The patient, Alexis St. Martin, survived, but was left with a permanent opening into his stomach from the outside.  Over the next few years, Dr. Beaumont used this crude fistula to sample gastric secretions.  He identified hydrochloric acid as the principal agent in gastric juice and recognized its digestive and bacteriostatic functions.  Many of his conclusions about the regulation of secretion and motility remain valid to this day.

 source

 

Written by LW

November 21, 2014 at 1:01 am

Living at the end of the Long Tail…

 

click here for video

YouTube suggests that under 30% of its videos account for over 99% of it’s traffic.  (The reigning champ:  Justin Bieber’s “Baby, featuring Ludacris,” with 598,457,143 views… and counting…)

But what of the rest?  Readers need no longer wonder.  Dadabot “randomly finds the least viewed videos on YouTube (for better or worse).”  Just click on over for selections that range from the poignant through the pointless to the putrid…

[TotH to Presurfer]

 

As we sit, transfixed, we might wish a responsive Happy Birthday to the Russian physiologist and psychologist Ivan Pavlov; he was born on this date in 1849.  Pavlov’s experiments with animals (most famously, with dogs) led him to develop the concept of the conditioned (or conditional) reflex (a specific behavioral response to a specific stimulus), and laid the foundation for Behaviorism.

(Lest readers think Thomas Pynchon’s imagination overheated, it is now known that Pavlov’s experimental “animals” included human children.)

Pavlov’s 1904 Nobel Prize portrait (source)

 

 

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