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Posts Tagged ‘magazines

“Merdre!”*…

 

If you were to browse a British newsstand in the early 1980s, you might have discovered a rather unusual magazine.

Called Protect & Survive Monthly or “PSM”, it aimed to teach people how to survive the almost unthinkable – nuclear war.

“How many citizens would know what to do to protect their own lives and loved ones?,” wrote editor Colin Bruce Sibley in the maiden issue. And how many, he asked, would look dumbfounded to the skies, “waiting for a ‘convenient’ bomb to explode above their head and blast them into eternity?”…

What’s old is new again: check out a publication offering detailed advice about how to prepare for nuclear war – it makes for timely, fascinating and occasionally morbid reading: “The bleak, chilling magazine for nuclear doomsday preppers.”

* Alfred Jarry, the opening line of Ubu Roi (and a deliberate misspelling)

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As we duck-and-cover, we might send painfully-prescient birthday greetings to Alfred Jarry; he was born on this date in 1873.  A Symbolist poet and critic, he is probably best known for his play Ubu Roi.  But he might more deservedly be famous for his creation of ‘pataphysics, a movement resurrected at the dawn of the Cold War (by the likes of Raymond Queneau, Eugène Ionesco, Joan Miró, Man Ray, Max Ernst, Julien Torma, Roger Shattuck, Groucho, Chico and Harpo Marx, and Marcel Duchamp)… and surely due for another revival about now.

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Written by LW

September 8, 2017 at 1:01 am

“In a magazine, one can get – from cover to cover – 15 to 20 different ideas about life and how to live it”*…

 

Magazine publishing is a dark art. But the world of niche publishing—people who create magazines for necrophiliacs or donkey hobbyists, or for those of us who like to ride really small trains—features its own requirements…

See for yourself: “Brief Interviews With Very Small Publishers.”

* Maya Angelou

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As we turn the pages, we might recall that it was on this date in 1981 that the first issue of The Record, Canada’s music industry magazine of record, was published.  For two decades it provided the canonical sales charts for the Canadian music business both directly and as part of Billboard‘s “Hits of the World” section.  It ceased print publication in 1999, surviving as a website for another three years before closing altogether in 2001.

The Record’s founder, David Farrell (left) announcing NewCanadianMusic.ca in 2012

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Written by LW

July 13, 2016 at 1:01 am

“But he who dares not grasp the thorn should never crave the rose”*…

 

If hearing Bret Michaels serenade Rock of Love contestants with his 1988 hit “Every Rose Has Its Thorn” wasn’t painful enough for you, artist Michael Ridge has come up with just the thing to give this hoary old power ballad some spice. With the aid of a contact mike, Ridge has figured out how to play Poison’s hit on his turntable using a branch from a rose bush in place of a stylus arm, and like actual thorns doing the needle’s job…

email readers click here for video

More at “An actual rose bush plays ‘Every Rose Has Its Thorn’“; and more of Ridge’s remarkable work at the creator’s link at the Vimeo page above and on his Soundcloud page.

* Anne Brontë

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As we drop the needle, we might recall that it was on this date in 1883 that Ladies Home Journal was first published.  Born of a a popular double-page supplement in the American magazine Tribune and Farmer titled Women at Home, it quickly became the most popular magazine of its type, and in 1903 became the first American magazine to reach 1 million subscribers.  One of “The Seven Sisters”– publications aimed at women: the Journal, plus Better Homes and Gardens, Family Circle, Good Housekeeping, McCall’s, Redbook and Woman’s Day— the Journal led the pack in circulation until 1963 (when it fell behind McCall’s).  Since 2014 its emphasis has been on the web; it has been available in print on newsstands only as a quarterly.

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Written by LW

February 16, 2016 at 1:01 am

Ennui! In color!…

(Some of) the comic stylings of Tom Gauld

Ladies and gentlemen, You’re All Just Jealous of My Jetpack!

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As we parse our predicaments into panels, we might recall that this was the cover date, in 1882, of the first issue of Golden Argosy, which featured stories by Horatio Alger, Jr. and Edward S. Ellis.  The first “pulp” magazine in the U.S., Golden Argosy (soon renamed simply Argosy) went on to publish such authors as Frank Converse, Malcolm Davis, Upton Sinclair, Zane Grey, and dime novelist William Wallace Cook.

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Written by LW

December 9, 2012 at 1:01 am

Survivors…

Conan O’Brien mourns the death of Newsweek in print: “It’s sad, it’s a little mind-boggling. And what’s even stranger and sadder is when you see some of the magazines that actually outlasted Newsweek.

Newsweek’s gone but these magazines still exist! These are all completely real:” Pond Hoppin, Chess Life, Pole Spin, Airports of the World, Where to Retire, Witches & Pagans, Weed World, Amateur Radio, Racing Pigeon Pictorial, and Just Labs.

JimRomenesko.com (via TeamCoCo)

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As we console ourselves that there does, after all, seem to be a future for journalism, we might recall that it was on this date in 1936 that Life became the third title (after Time and Fortune) in Henry Luce’s publication stable.   The first (essentially) all-photographic American news magazine, it dominated the market for more than 40 years, selling more than 13.5 million copies a week at one point; it was so popular that President Harry S. Truman, Sir Winston Churchill and General Douglas MacArthur all serialized their memoirs in its pages.  Life succeeded as a weekly through 1972, at which point it receded to a series of occasional special editions.  From 1978 to 2000, it was published as a monthly; then in 2004, revived again (through 2007), as a newspaper insert.  In 2008, Time Inc. allowed Google to host the magazine’s image bank (many, previously unpublished).  And finally, in 2009, Life.com was launched; it closed in January of this year.

Here is that first issue’s cover; readers may also enjoy Flavorpill’s selection of  “The Ten Greatest Life Magazine Covers of All Time.”

The Fort Peck Dam in Montana, photographed by Margaret Bourke-White

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Written by LW

November 23, 2012 at 1:01 am

Gross!…

 

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Michael Gross, the art director of the National Lampoon in its 70s heyday and creator of the (in)famous work above, also created a parody issue of Print.

Read all about it in “The Cutting Humor of Michael Gross” in ImPrint

[TotH to J.J. Sedelmaier]

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As we reach for the rubber cement, we might recall that it was on this date in 1955 that Richard Wayne Penniman– better known as Little Richard– recorded Tutti Frutti.”  As History.com reports,

Tutti frutti, good booty…” was the way the version went that Little Richard was accustomed to performing in his club act, and from there it got into lyrical territory that would demand censorship even by today’s standards. It was during a lunch break from his first-ever recording session that Little Richard went to the piano and banged that filthy tune out for producer Bumps Blackwell, who was extremely unhappy with the results of the session so far. As Blackwell would later tell it, “He hits that piano, dididididididididi…and starts to sing, ‘Awop-bop-a-Loo-Mop a-good Goddam…’ and I said ‘Wow! That’s what I want from you Richard. That’s a hit!'” But first, the song’s racy lyrics had to be reworked for there to be any chance of the song being deemed acceptable by the conservative American audience of the 1950s.

An aspiring local songwriter by the name of Dorothy La Bostrie was quickly summoned to the Dew Drop Inn [in New Orleans] to come up with new lyrics for the un-recordable original, and by the time they all returned from lunch, the “Tutti frutti, all rooty” with which we are now familiar was written down alongside lyrics about two gals named Sue and Daisy. In the last 15 minutes of that historic recording session on September 14, 1955, “Tutti Frutti” was recorded, and Little Richard’s claim to have been present at the birth of rock and roll was secured.

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Written by LW

September 14, 2012 at 1:01 am

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