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Posts Tagged ‘Bugs Bunny

“The sweat of hard work is not to be displayed. It is much more graceful to appear favored by the gods.”*…

 

If riding a giant log down a steep mountain sounds like an ideal way to spend a quiet spring afternoon, the Onbashira Festival is for you. Held every 6 years in Nagano, Japan, the festival involves moving enormous logs over difficult terrain completely by hand with the help of thickly braided ropes and an occasional assist from gravity as the logs barrel down hills. The purpose is to symbolically renew a nearby shrine where each log is eventually placed to support the foundation of several shrine buildings. The event has reportedly continued uninterrupted for 1,200 years…

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More at: “A Glimpse into Onbashira, the Dangerous Japanese Log Moving Festival.”

* Maxine Hong Kingston

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As we fulminate on flumes, we might recall that it was on this date in 1940 that the Warner Bros. Merrie Melodies animated short “A Wild Hare”– the first “official” Bugs Bunny cartoon– premiered (though readers will recall that Bugs [or at least, his prototype] made his inaugural screen appearance two years earlier).  Directed by Tex Avery, “A Wild Hare” was nominated for an Academy Award.

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Written by LW

July 27, 2016 at 1:01 am

Eh… What’s up, Doc?…

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The inimitable Chuck Jones— animator, and director of well over 200 Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies shorts (plus TV specials and feature films) starring Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, the Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote, Sylvester, Pepé Le Pew and others from the Warner Bros. menagerie– on “how to draw Bugs Bunny”:

From the terrific film Chuck Amuck.

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As we keep an eye out for Elmer, we might send rhyming birthday wishes to Ben Jonson; he was born on this date in 1572.  While Jonson is probably best remembered these days as the author of hysterically-funny satirical plays like  VolponeThe Alchemist, and Bartholomew Fair, he was also an accomplished poet, whose work  (especially his lyric poetry) was tremendously influential and his Jacobean contemporaries and on the Carolines.

Jonson was a contemporary of Shakespeare, and is often remembered as a rival– probably, given the competitive atmosphere of the theater in those days, accurately.  But it was Jonson who provided the prefatory verse that opens Shakespeare’s First Folio (which Jonson may, some scholars believe, have helped to edit).  Indeed, it was Jonson who animated the view of Shakespeare as a “natural,” an author who, despite “small Latine, and lesse Greeke,” wrote works of genius.  But lest one take that as back-handed praise (Jonson was himself classically educated), Jonson concludes:

Yet must I not give Nature all: Thy Art,

My gentle Shakespeare, must enjoy a part.

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Written by LW

June 11, 2012 at 1:08 am

From the Department of Superfluous Redundancy…

 

From Damn Cool Pictures, “50 Completely Useless Signs“…

More at Damn Cool Pictures.

As we await further instructions, we might recall that it was on this date in 1940 that the Warner Bros. Merrie Melodies animated short “A Wild Hare”– the first “official” Bugs Bunny cartoon– premiered (though readers will recall that Bugs [or at least, his prototype] made his inaugural screen appearance two years earlier).  Directed by Tex Avery, “A Wild Hare” was nominated for an Academy Award.

source

 

The perfect food, explained…

Jeff Varasano, who learned his craft in NYC, now runs a pizzeria in Atlanta– one that, your correspondent can attest, is very, very good.  While that’s rare enough, what’s rarer still, is that Varasano is willing to share.  And just as Jeff is generous in the preparation of his pies, so he is forthcoming– very forthcoming– in explaining how he makes “the perfect pizza.”

Readers can visit “Jeff Varasano’s Famous New York Pizza Recipe” for everything– and your correspondent does mean everything— one could possibly want to know.  (The page takes a while to load, but it’s worth the wait:  at the bottom is Jeff’s list of top pizzerias around the country.)

As we reach for the crushed red pepper, we might recall that it was on this date in 1938 that “Porky’s Hare Hunt” was released.  The Warner Bros. cartoon was a remake by Ben “Bugs” Hardaway and Cal Dalton of a 1936 animated short by Tex Avery, “Porky’s Duck Hunt.”  The earlier toon had introduced Daffy Duck; “Porky’s Hare Hunt” was the debut of (the still-unnamed) Bugs Bunny.

While Bob Clampett created the character, Hardaway’s character sheet for (visualization of) Bugs– who became Warner’s biggest star– was chosen from among several; thus, “Bugs’ Bunny”– note the possessive apostrophe…  But as the rapacious rabbit became a hit, he was emancipated from his maker; the apostrophe was dropped.

Porky and “Bugs’ Bunny”

Hey, squirt!…

(Photo by Helen E. Raleigh of C.W. Slagle Antiques, via Popular Mechanics)

Given the season, one might be grateful to Popular Mechanics for its round-up of The Top 6 Water Guns of All Time

As we pack for the pool, we might might stutter a respectful “Th-th-th-th-that’s all, folks!,” as it was on this date that Melvin Jerome “Mel” Blanc– the voice of Bugs Bunny, Porky Pig, Elmer Fudd, and countless other Warner Brothers/Looney Tunes (and later Hanna-Barbera) cartoon characters– died in 1989…  just a year after voicing Daffy Duck in his classic Who Framed Roger Rabbit duel with Donald…

(source: The B.S. Report)

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