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Posts Tagged ‘Porky Pig

From the Department of Superfluous Redundancy…

 

From Damn Cool Pictures, “50 Completely Useless Signs“…

More at Damn Cool Pictures.

As we await further instructions, we might recall that it was on this date in 1940 that the Warner Bros. Merrie Melodies animated short “A Wild Hare”– the first “official” Bugs Bunny cartoon– premiered (though readers will recall that Bugs [or at least, his prototype] made his inaugural screen appearance two years earlier).  Directed by Tex Avery, “A Wild Hare” was nominated for an Academy Award.

source

 

The perfect food, explained…

Jeff Varasano, who learned his craft in NYC, now runs a pizzeria in Atlanta– one that, your correspondent can attest, is very, very good.  While that’s rare enough, what’s rarer still, is that Varasano is willing to share.  And just as Jeff is generous in the preparation of his pies, so he is forthcoming– very forthcoming– in explaining how he makes “the perfect pizza.”

Readers can visit “Jeff Varasano’s Famous New York Pizza Recipe” for everything– and your correspondent does mean everything— one could possibly want to know.  (The page takes a while to load, but it’s worth the wait:  at the bottom is Jeff’s list of top pizzerias around the country.)

As we reach for the crushed red pepper, we might recall that it was on this date in 1938 that “Porky’s Hare Hunt” was released.  The Warner Bros. cartoon was a remake by Ben “Bugs” Hardaway and Cal Dalton of a 1936 animated short by Tex Avery, “Porky’s Duck Hunt.”  The earlier toon had introduced Daffy Duck; “Porky’s Hare Hunt” was the debut of (the still-unnamed) Bugs Bunny.

While Bob Clampett created the character, Hardaway’s character sheet for (visualization of) Bugs– who became Warner’s biggest star– was chosen from among several; thus, “Bugs’ Bunny”– note the possessive apostrophe…  But as the rapacious rabbit became a hit, he was emancipated from his maker; the apostrophe was dropped.

Porky and “Bugs’ Bunny”

No BONES about it…

From the ever-entertaining (and insightful) xkcd.  (As to the allusion in the title of this post… a weakness to which your correspondent will confess.)

As we recalibrate our expectations of our instruments, we might acknowledge imprecision-in-practice, as it was on this date in 2001 that a Joint Session of Congress (with then Vice President Al Gore presiding) certified the election of George W. Bush…

at work

And in an example of synchronicity that would light Arthur Koestler’s eyes, this was also the date on which, in 1936, Porky Pig made his debut in his commonly-known form in Tex Avery’s Gold Diggers of ’49.  Porky had been introduced the prior year, but in a younger, quieter, and thinner incarnation, by Bob Clampitt (of later Beany and Cecil renown).  Porky was voiced in (and immediately following) Avery’s toon by Joe Dougherty, who actually did have a stuttering problem.  But because Dougherty could not control his stutter,  his recording sessions took hours. Thus, the extraordinary Mel Blanc replaced Dougherty in 1937.

What more is there to say?…

Hey, squirt!…

(Photo by Helen E. Raleigh of C.W. Slagle Antiques, via Popular Mechanics)

Given the season, one might be grateful to Popular Mechanics for its round-up of The Top 6 Water Guns of All Time

As we pack for the pool, we might might stutter a respectful “Th-th-th-th-that’s all, folks!,” as it was on this date that Melvin Jerome “Mel” Blanc– the voice of Bugs Bunny, Porky Pig, Elmer Fudd, and countless other Warner Brothers/Looney Tunes (and later Hanna-Barbera) cartoon characters– died in 1989…  just a year after voicing Daffy Duck in his classic Who Framed Roger Rabbit duel with Donald…

(source: The B.S. Report)

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