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Posts Tagged ‘Picasso

“Imitation, if it is not forgery, is a fine thing. It stems from a generous impulse, and a realistic sense of what can and cannot be done.”*…

 

German artist Edgar Mrugalla was incredibly prolific in his lifetime, having painted more than 3,500 pieces by the time he was 65. And yet, not one of those was an original work. Mrugalla was an expert art forger, copying the works of Rembrandt, Picasso, Renoir and many other masters. His self-taught skill even earned him two years in prison, only to be released by working with authorities to uncover which artworks might be forgeries, including his own.

Though none were original, some of Mrugalla’s works are now on display in a museum: the Museum of Art Fakes in Vienna. Diane Grobe, co-owner and founder of the museum that opened in 2005, credits Mrugalla with the inspiration for the opening. “[I was inspired by] his exciting stories,” Grobe told Smithsonian.com via email. “He gave [the museum] our first forgeries —​ [paintings copying] Rembrandt, Müller [and] Picasso. After this meeting, we [looked] for other counterfeiters with similar exciting lives, [including Thomas​] Keating, [Eric] Hebborn [and Han van] ​Meegeren, and then we began to collect their forgeries.” Now, the museum holds a collection of more than 80 forged works…

Forged Matisse

Begin your visit (if only, for a start, virtually) at: “Everything in This Museum Is Fake“; browse the collection here.

* James Fenton

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As we ruminate on the real, we might wish feliz cumpleaños to Pablo Picasso; he was born on this date in 1881.  So prolific in so many forms that he (almost) outran forgers of his work, he was also so impactful– he is probably the best-known artist of the 2oth century– that he attracted them like flies.

Picasso in 1908

source

 

Written by LW

October 25, 2017 at 1:01 am

Communities of Interest…

 

From the World Taxidermy & Fish Carving Championships

Arthur Drooker goes to meetings…

From the annual meeting of the Association of Lincoln Presenters

From the 37th Vent Haven Convention, which bills itself as “the oldest and largest annual gathering of ventriloquists”

From BronyCon, the annual convention for fans of Hasbro’s animated television series “My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic”

Conventional Wisdom
The U.S. meetings industry, according to a Convention Industry Council study, directly supports 1.7 million jobs, $263 billion in spending, and $14.3 billion in federal tax revenue.  As impressive as these figures are, they don’t interest me as a photographer. I see conventions not as revenue sources but as visual treasures. To me, they’re unique expressions of community, culture and connection. That’s why over the next year I plan to attend about twenty conventions—the more unusual and photogenic the better—and document them for a proposed book, Conventional Wisdom.  I will update this portfolio as the project progresses. At the same time, I will preview the work on coolhunting.com in a series of reports. To view these reports, please click on the list below.

So far, the wisdom I’ve gained from this project has shown me that regardless of what they’re about, where they’re held or who attends them, all conventions satisfy a basic human urge: a longing for belonging. At conventions, people who share similar interests, even obsessions, come together to bond and to be themselves. The outside world doesn’t matter. In fact, for the weekend duration of most conventions, the outside world doesn’t even exist. The conventioneers have each other and that’s all they need. An attendee I met at the taxidermist convention put it best. “This isn’t a convention,” he said. “It’s a family reunion.”

Coolhunting Report #1 (Lincolns)

Coolhunting Report #2 (Taxidermists)

Coolhunting Report #3 (Ventriloquists)

Coolhunting Report #4 (Bronies)

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As we expedite our registrations, we might recall that it was on this date in 1911 that poet, playwright, and novelist Guillaume Apollinaire was arrested and jailed for complicity in the theft of the Mona Lisa (and a number of Egyptian statuettes) from the Louvre.  Apollinaire had been working as an art critic, in which capacity he’d once called for the Louvre to be burned to the ground.  And he’d sheltered the actual thief, Vincenzo Peruggia, after the heist…  but he claimed ignorance of the crime and returned the few statuettes that Peruggia had left behind at his place.  He was ultimately exonerated, but not before he implicated his his friend Pablo Picasso (who was also brought in for questioning, then also released).

 source

 

Written by LW

September 7, 2013 at 1:01 am

“All photos are accurate. None of them is the truth”*…

Long Island, NY, USA, July 1, 1993. Courtesy the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery, New York & Paris; © Rineke Dijkstra

Dutch photographer Rineke Dijkstra conceived her Beach Portraits series after breaking her hip. She had snapped some self-portraits at the pool following her physiotherapy sessions, when she realized: “I was fascinated by capturing something unconscious and natural in a photograph, something that was miles away from the boring and predictable businessmen I had until then mostly photographed. I was interested in photographing people at moments when they had dropped all pretense of a pose.”

Jalta, Ukraine July 30, 1993. Courtesy the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery, New York & Paris; © Rineke Dijkstra

More of Beach Portraits here, and an interview with the photographer here.  Readers in or through New York City can catch a retrospective of Dijkstra’s work at the Guggenheim starting June 29.

* Richard Avedon

 

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As we assume the position,we might recall that it was on this date in 1901 that art dealer Henri-Louis-Ambroise Vollard gave (then) 19 year old Pablo Picasso his first art show; the paintings (largely from the Blue Period) sold well, though at low prices.  The exhibition was the start of long relationship between Picasso and Vollard– who had been important in the careers of Van Gogh, Cezanne, the Fauves (Matisse, Rouault, and Derain), Degas, Renoir, and Gaugin.  It was Vollard who helped Picasso establish his relationship with collectors Gertrude and Leo Stein, and who built Picasso’s early reputation (by “advertising” a connection between Picasso’s work and Cezanne’s).

Picasso’s “Portrait of Ambroise Vollard” 1910

source

Written by LW

June 24, 2012 at 1:01 am

Elegant Endings (and Blissful Beginnings)…

 

source

Best reason to go adventuring in Wonderland:

Lastly, she pictured to herself how this same little sister of hers would, in the after-time, be herself a grown woman; and how she would keep, through all her riper years, the simple and loving heart of her childhood; and how she would gather about her other little children, and make their eyes bright and eager with many a strange tale, perhaps even with the dream of Wonderland of long ago; and how she would feel with all their simple sorrows, and find a pleasure in all their simple joys, remembering her own child-life, and the happy summer days.

– the last line of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, Lewis Carroll

19 other conclusive gems at Flavorwire’s “Famous Last Words: Our 20 Favorite Final Lines in Literature.”

And for a complementary collection of such wonders as…

Many years later, as he faced the firing squad, Colonel Aureliano Buendía was to remember that distant afternoon when his father took him to discover ice.

—the opening line of Gabriel García Márquez’ One Hundred Years of Solitude (1967; trans. Gregory Rabassa)

…visit the American Book Review’s “100 Best First Lines from Novels.”

 

As we reach for our library cards, we might recall that it was on this date in 1910 that Alice B. Toklas moved in permanently with Gertrude Stein.  The two women turned their Paris home (22 rue de Fleurus) into an artistic and literary salon, where they hosted Picasso, Matisse, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, and many others– several of whom appear, with Ms. Stein herself, in the lists above.

Cecil Beaton’s photo of Stein and Toklas at home (source)

 

The eyes of the beholders…

Readers will know Etsy, the successful online “market for handmade things,” where the mission is “to enable people to make a living making things, and to reconnect makers with buyers.”

Now, thanks to reader PL, readers can discover Regretsy— a site that focuses on a sub-set of the postings on Etsy; as Regretsy’s motto explains:  “Handmade? It looks like you made it with your feet.”

For example:

or…

Regretsy is quick to be clear about where it stands:

Don’t get us wrong. We like crafts.

We just don’t like these crafts.

Yes, we know these people put their hearts into it. We know it took hours and hours. We know how mean it is to laugh at their creations. And we regret being the only web site on the internet that makes fun of things.

But what can we do? We’re immature.

Besides, art is totally subjective. Who cares what we think? I barely care and I’m writing this.

Listen, if you like something you see here, don’t argue with us, go and buy it. Seriously. Click on any photo and you’ll be taken to the seller’s store (if a photo is not linked, the store is closed, or we are unable to find the seller). We’re only too glad to have made the introduction.

Otherwise, we’re just going to sit here and look at the amputee kitten paintings and vulva earrings and laugh so hard that we pee in our reusable Pokemon pads.

Etsy, for its part, has been very gracious: “If it brings in more traffic to the shop and helps make sales, then all the better.”  And in fact, many of the items featured on Regretsy have found new owners.

For our parts, lest we rush too quickly to any judgments, we might recall the thoughts of several close observers of beauty and the arts:

Good taste is the first refuge of the non-creative. It is the last ditch stand of the artist.
– Marshall McLuhan

It is good taste, and good taste alone, that possesses the power to sterilize and is always the first handicap to any creative functioning.
– Salvador Dali

Taste is the enemy of creativity.
– Pablo Picasso

As we reach for those knitting needles, we might ponder bobbing our hair in commemoration of the incomparable Louise Brooks, fabled actress (Pandora’s Box and other Pabst greats) and author of Lulu in Hollywood; she was born this day in 1906.

in Pandora’s Box

Written by LW

November 14, 2009 at 1:01 am

Sunday at the Opera with Enrico…

From the Caruso Archive in Denmark, a set of digitally-remastered recordings of Enrico Caruso, “The Golden Voice of the Century,” available for free download.

Bravo!

As we clear our throats, we might wish feliz cumpleaños to Caruso’s (rough) contemporary, Pablo Picasso, born on this date in 1881…

Modigliani, Picasso and André Salmon (l to r) in front the Café de la Rotonde, Paris, 1916

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Written by LW

October 25, 2009 at 12:01 am

There’s a reason it’s “a cliche”…

source: BBC

As we shake our spray cans, we might recall that it was on this date in 1910 that Krazy Kat, the comic strip by George Herriman debuted in New York Journal (as the “downstairs” strip in Herriman’s predecessor comic, The Dingbat Family (later, The Family Upstairs).  Krazy, Ignatz, and Offisa Pup stepped out on their own in 1913, and ran until 1944– but never actually succeeded financially.  It was only the admiration (and support) of publisher William Randolph Hearst that kept those bricks aloft…

Ignatz Mouse, Officer Pupp, and Krazy

Written by LW

June 20, 2009 at 12:01 am

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