(Roughly) Daily

Posts Tagged ‘vegetarianism

“Now I luxuriously thrust for noble pickle”*…

The delicacy that delights…

Amerigo Vespucci didn’t discover the Americas, contrary to what the map-makers who named the continents believed, but his given name did end up lending itself to the so-called “new world.” And Ralph Waldo Emerson once called Vespucci “the pickle-dealer at Seville,” a derisive label that may have stretched the truth a bit, but pointed towards a very real part of the itinerant Italian’s biography.

Before traveling to the New World himself, Vespucci worked as a ship chandler—someone who sold supplies to seafaring merchants and explorers. These supplies included foods like meat, fish, and vegetables that had been pickled, which meant they would stay preserved beneath a ship’s deck for months. Without pickling, expeditions had to rely on dried foods and ingredients with naturally long shelf lives for sustenance. Much of the time, this limited diet wasn’t enough to provide crewmembers the nutrition they needed for the journey ahead. This made pickle sellers like Vespucci indispensable during the golden age of exploration. Vespucci even supplied Christopher Columbus’s later voyages across the Atlantic with his briny goods. So while he wasn’t the world’s most important explorer, Vespucci’s pickles may have changed history by preventing untold bouts of scurvy.

And pickles weren’t just enjoyed by 15th century sailors. From ancient Mesopotamia to New York deli counters, they’ve played a vital role in the global culinary scene. But where do pickles come from? How did the cucumber become the standard-issue pickling vegetable in the States? And what exactly is a pickle, anyway?…

The story of a humble but crucial comestible: “A Brief History of Pickles.”

Martial

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As we dig in, we might spare a thought for Sylvester Graham; he died on this date in 1851. A Presbyterian minister, he preached primarily of the benefits of vegetarianism (and temperance). He urged the use only of whole, coarse grains– inspiring a host of graham flour, graham bread, and graham cracker products.

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Written by (Roughly) Daily

September 11, 2021 at 1:00 am

“Life is a highway”*…

 

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62 years ago, there was no Interstate Highway System. Now, the system covers nearly 50,000 miles in the US. The growth of the US interstate is stunning to behold when you chart it through time…

A quick and fascinating history at “The Evolution Of The US Interstate Through Time, Mapped“; explore Geotab‘s interactive timeline here.

* Tom Cochrane

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As we hit the road, we might send healthy birthday greetings to Sylvester Graham; he was born on this date in 1794.  A presbyterian minister, he is better remembered as a  dietary reformer who preached vegetarianism, supported the temperance movement, and emphasized eating whole-grain bread.  Though he neither invented nor profited from his legacy, his sermons inspired his followers to create graham flour, graham bread and the graham cracker.

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Written by (Roughly) Daily

July 6, 2018 at 1:01 am

“The thought of two thousand people crunching celery at the same time horrified me”*…

 

Eliminating meat from our diets would bring a bounty of benefits to the planet’s health and to our own – but, a quick transition would not be without its costs: it could harm millions of people…

People become vegetarians for a variety of reasons. Some do it to alleviate animal suffering, others because they want to pursue a healthier lifestyle. Still others are fans of sustainability or wish to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

No matter how much their carnivorous friends might deny it, vegetarians have a point: cutting out meat delivers multiple benefits. And the more who make the switch, the more those perks would manifest on a global scale.

But if everyone became a committed vegetarian, there would be serious drawbacks for millions, if not billions, of people.

“It’s a tale of two worlds, really,” says Andrew Jarvis of Colombia’s International Centre for Tropical Agriculture. “In developed countries, vegetarianism would bring all sorts of environmental and health benefits. But in developing countries there would be negative effects in terms of poverty.”…

More at “What would happen if the world suddenly went vegetarian?

* George Bernard Shaw (vegetarian)

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As we opt for the vegiburger, we might recall that, for all our sins, to day is National Sausage Pizza Day. While pizza dates back (at least) to the ancient Greek custom of covering bread with oils, herbs and cheese (in Byzantine Greek, the dish was spelled πίτα (pita)meaning “pie”), pizza-as-we-know-it seems to have been born in modern Italy as Neapolitan flatbread.  An estimated 3 billion pizzas are sold in the U.S. every year, an average of 350 per second; 17% of all restaurants in the U.S. are pizzerias, more than 10% of which are in New York City. [source]

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Written by (Roughly) Daily

October 11, 2016 at 1:01 am

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