(Roughly) Daily

Posts Tagged ‘social media

Social Media: Systematically Gaming the System…

 

xkcd

 

As we reconsider acting on those Yelp reviews, we might recall that it was on this date in 1967 that “La Bateau,” a 1953 paper cut by Henri Matisse was hung in New York’s Museum of Modern Art…  upside down.  It remained on inverted display for 47 days.  Genevieve Habert, a stockbroker, noticed the mistake (by comparing the hanging to the photo in the catalogue).  As it was a Sunday night and there were no curatorial officials on duty, Habert informed the New York Times, which in turn notified Monroe Wheeler, the Museum’s art director… who had the piece rehung correctly on Monday.

source

source

 

Written by LW

October 17, 2011 at 1:01 am

In a flash (mob)…

Over 27 million YouTube viewers have watched Saatchi & Saatchi’s “T-Mobile Dance,” a (supposed) flash mob that comes together at London’s Liverpool Station in terpsichorean tribute to the wireless carrier– and winner of “Commercial of the Year” at 2010’s  British Television Advertising Awards.

Rival agency M&C Saatchi took the same concept and used it in Beirut…

It’s no more a genuinely-spontaneous gathering than the British “mob” on which it riffs.  But this testament to social media, shot (earlier this month,on March 5th) in a Middle Eastern airport in promotional service of international travel and commerce (Duty Free), coexists with the regional reality of spontaneous social and political unrest– unrest that actually has been abetted by social media, unrest that actually has the emergent character of flash mobs…

The ironies abound.

[via VSL]

As we monitor our Twitter feeds more closely, we might celebrate another example of “art-in-the-service-of-commerce imitating life– only more so”:  on this date (April Fool’s Day) in 1963 that the ABC television network aired the premiere episode of General Hospital, the daytime drama that became the network’s (and television’s) most enduring soap opera– and the longest-running serial program produced in Hollywood.  (The world’s longest-running soap opera currently airing on television is the British series Coronation Street, on air since December 9, 1960.)

source

The Challenges of Social Media, Part 69…

source

As we titter over Twitter, we might note that it was on this date in 1925 that Calvin Coolidge became the first U.S. President to have his inaugural address broadcast (on the radio).  Indeed, his retiring reputation notwithstanding, Coolidge was a veritable master of the media of his day:  in 1923 (as he served out Harding’s term) he became the first president to have a Congressional address broadcast; then in 1924, he gave the first broadcast political speech; that same year he obliged Lee De Forest, and became the first President to appear in a film with recorded sound.  Coolidge’s mastery of the media extended to policy as well: he engineered, then signed the Radio Act of 1927, which assigned regulation of radio to the newly created Federal Radio Commission.  And he understood the power of the press– he gave 529 press conferences, meeting with reporters more regularly than any President before or since.

Coolidge delivering his inaugural address

%d bloggers like this: