(Roughly) Daily

Posts Tagged ‘garbage

“The love of learning, the sequestered nooks, / And all the sweet serenity of books”*…

Righteous recycling: garbage collectors in Ankara started “reclaiming” discarded books and ended up opening a library….

It all started when sanitation worker Durson Ipek found a bag of cast-off books when he was working and then it snowballed from there. Ipek and other garbage men started gathering the books they found on the streets that were destined for landfills and as their collection started to grow, so did word of mouth. Soon, local residents started donating books directly.

The library that originally contained 200 books is located in the Cankaya district of the capital city in a previously vacant brick factory at the sanitation department headquarters. The library was initially available only to the sanitation employees and their families to use but as the collection grew, so did public interest and the library was opened to the public in December 2017…

All the books that are found are sorted and checked for condition, if they pass, they go on the shelves. In fact, everything in the library was also rescued including the bookshelves and the artwork that adorns the walls…

Today, the library has over 6,000 books that range from fiction to nonfiction and there’s a very popular children’s section that even has a collection of comic books. An entire section is devoted to scientific research and there are also books available in English and French…

The full story at: “Turkish Garbage Collectors Open a Library from Books Rescued from the Trash

* Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

###

As we check it out, we might spare a thought for James Billington; he died on this date in 2018. A historian at Harvard and Princeton, who went on to hold the directorship of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Billington is probably best remembered for his final post, Librarian of Congress, a position he held from 1987 to 2015.

The Library of Congress, the oldest federal cultural institution in the U.S., is the nation’s de facto national library. As librarian, Billington oversaw that resource and appointed the U.S. poet laureate and awarded the Gershwin Prize for Popular Song each year. Billington undertook during his tenure to broaden and deepen public access to the LoC’s remarkable holdings, introducing a series of no-fee access services.

As Librarian, he also oversaw the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). In 2010, Billington’s decision to open new DMCA loopholes resulted in his being described as “the most important person you never heard of.”

source

“Ours is a culture and a time as immensely rich in trash as it is in treasures”*…

 

… and sometimes the trash is treasure:

There’s a Covanta Holding Corp. incinerator outside Philadelphia that produces electricity from burning garbage. It also produces something else: stacks and stacks of blackened, sooty coins.

Over the course of a year, those nickels, dimes and quarters add up to about $360,000. That’s seven times the average income in the Philadelphia metropolitan region, and the money is piling up as Covanta waits for the U.S. Mint to resume coin purchases under an exchange program it suspended in November.

About $61.8 million of loose change is accidentally thrown away every year in the U.S., Covanta estimates. The coins get swept off restaurant tables, mixed in with scraps when people empty their pockets, and vacuumed up from carpets or sofa cushions. The money used to end up in the dump, but as trash volume increases and open space dwindles, landfill-disposal costs are up 25 percent in the past decade. That’s created an incentive for Covanta and other companies to develop ways to sift through mountains of garbage and extract steel, iron, aluminum and copper for sale to recyclers…

More at “We Toss $62 Million of Loose Change Every Year. This Company Wants Some of It.”

* Ray Bradbury, Zen in the Art of Writing

###

As we check again under our sofa cushions, we might spare a thought for Blessed John (Johannes, Ioannes) Duns Scotus, O.F.M.; he died on this date in 1308.  One of the most important philosophers of the High Middle Ages (with his arch-rival, William of Ockham), Duns Scotus was a champion of a form of Scholasticism that came to be known as Scotism.

But he may be better remembered as a result of the slurs of 16th Century philosophers, who considered him a sophist– and coined the insult “dunce” (someone incapable of scholarship) from the name “Dunse” given to his followers in the 1500s.

 source

Written by (Roughly) Daily

November 8, 2016 at 1:01 am

“American cities are like badger holes, ringed with trash– all of them”*…

 

garbage

Widely considered to be the first sanitary landfill in the U.S., the Fresno garbage dump, which opened in 1937, has the dubious distinction of being named to both the U.S. National Register of Historic Places and the nation’s list of Superfund sites. That’s a funny pair of categories to straddle, but it illustrates an important point: Trash is a starring character in the American story, even as we continue to wrestle with its consequences…

Dumpster dive at “Mapping America’s Mountains of Garbage.”

* John Steinbeck, Travels with Charley: In Search of America

###

As we sort compost from recycling, we might recall that it was on this date in 1583 that Sir Humphrey Gilbert established the first English colony in North America, at what is now St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador.

 source

 

Written by (Roughly) Daily

August 5, 2016 at 1:01 am

Talking trash…

From Mintlife, the blog of the online finance manager, Mint, “Trashonomics“:

excerpt; click the image above or here for the full infographic

As we redouble our efforts to find contentment in composting, we might find encouragement in the memory that it was on this date in 1915 that Dinosaur National Monument was established in Colorado and Utah.

Inside the dinosaur quarry (source)

Written by (Roughly) Daily

October 4, 2010 at 12:01 am

Every Picture Tells a Story…

2m40 (“Un blog impactant”) is devoted to chronicling the problems that develop when truckers fail to heed the warning sign at the mouth of one of Paris’ tunnels.  The site is in French…  but then, the pictures do speak for themselves.

As we watch our heads, we might recall that it was on this date in 187 that the Mobro, a garbage barge, left Islip, Long Island, on what turned into a six-month odyssey.  It stopped in several other states and three other countries, looking for a place to dump the 3,200 tons of garbage it was carrying– but was turned away each time.  Eventually, it sailed back to Islip, where space was found.

source: Macrobuddies

Written by (Roughly) Daily

March 22, 2010 at 2:02 am

%d bloggers like this: