(Roughly) Daily

Posts Tagged ‘eponymous laws

“What’s in a name?”*…

Poe’s Law –  “Without a winking smiley or other blatant display of humour, it is impossible to create a parody of fundamentalism that someone won’t mistake for the real thing.”

Cohen’s Law – “Whoever resorts to the argument that ‘whoever resorts to the argument that… …has automatically lost the debate’ has automatically lost the debate.”

Badger’s Law –  “any website with the word “Truth” in the URL has none in the posted content.”

Lewis’ Law – “The comments on any article about feminism justify feminism.”

Time Cube Law –  “As the length of a webpage grows linearly, the likelihood of the author being a lunatic increases exponentially.”

A small selection of entries in “Eponymous Laws Part I: Laws of the Internet,” from @RogersBacon1.

[Image above: source]

* Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet

###

As we go to school on the laws, we might send carefully-composed birthday greetings to Jean Sammet; she was born on this date in 1928. A pioneer in computing, she left a career as a professor of mathematics at the University of Illinois to join IBM, where she developed the computer programming language FORMAC, an extension to FORTRAN IV that was the first commonly used language for manipulating non-numeric algebraic expressions. She also wrote one of the classic histories of programming languages, Programming Languages: History and Fundamentals.

source

“No scientific discovery is named after its discoverer”*…

 

 click here (and again) for a larger version

Via Lapham’s Quarterly, “Eponymous laws: Legal Nomenclature.”

* “Stigler’s Law”  Statistician Stephen Stigler (who attributes the law to sociologist Robert Merton)

###

As we give credit where credit is due, we might send expensive birthday greetings to Irving Paul “Swifty” Lazar; he was born on his date in 1907.  A bankruptcy lawyer turned talent agent, he represented Humphrey Bogart (who gave Lazar his nickname), Lauren Bacall, Truman Capote, Cher, Joan Collins, Noël Coward, Ira Gershwin, Cary Grant, Moss Hart, Ernest Hemingway, Gene Kelly, Madonna, Walter Matthau, Larry McMurtry, Vladimir Nabokov, Clifford Odets, Cole Porter, William Saroyan, Irwin Shaw, Richard Nixon (Lazar negotiated the interview with David Frost), and Tennessee Williams (among many others).  Lazar’s power grew to such an extent that he could negotiate a deal for someone who wasn’tt even his client, then collect a fee from that person’s agent.

In a 1993 profile of Lazar, Michael Korda recalled his first glimpse of the self-dubbed “Prince of Pitch”:

The person in question was standing on the other side of the pool, an incongruous, diminutive figure among all the half-naked, oiled, and bronzed bodies. He was totally bald, and his face–what could be seen of it below huge, glittering gold-rimmed Ray-Ban aviator sunglasses–was tanned, like his pate, to the color of a well-cared-for crocodile handbag. He was wearing tiny white shoes, a blue blazer with gold buttons, and white trousers pressed so perfectly, despite the heat, that he looked like a shiny, expensive beach toy that had just been unpacked by some lucky child. He was shouting into a telephone…

Asked in 1975 to summarize his philosophy, Lazar replied with what might be called “Lazar’s Law”: “In a deal, you give and take. You compromise. Then you grab the cash and catch the next train out of town.”

Swifty Lazar, with Diana Ross

source

 

Written by (Roughly) Daily

March 28, 2018 at 1:01 am

Now let us praise famous men (and women)…

 source

From Aitken’s to Zipf’s— some of them coined by their namesake (e.g., Parkinson’s); others, based on their work or publications (a la Moore’s): consider the rules, adages, observations, and predictions that make up The List of Eponymous Laws.

###

As we take the oath, we might spare a thought for Persian polymath Omar Khayyam; the philosopher, mathematician, astronomer, epigrammatist, and poet died on this date in 1131.  While he’s probably best known to English-speakers as a poet, via Edward FitzGerald’s famous translation of the quatrains that comprise the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam, Omar was one of the major mathematicians and astronomers of the medieval period.  He is the author of one of the most important treatises on algebra written before modern times, the Treatise on Demonstration of Problems of Algebra, which includes a geometric method for solving cubic equations by intersecting a hyperbola with a circle.  His astronomical observations contributed to the reform of the Persian calendar.  And he made important contributions to mechanics, geography, mineralogy, music, climatology, and Islamic theology.

 source

Written by (Roughly) Daily

December 4, 2013 at 1:01 am

%d bloggers like this: