(Roughly) Daily

Posts Tagged ‘ukulele

“My name is Max. My world is fire.”*…

 

The inspiration for this project was the Doof Warrior’s flamethrower guitar from Mad Max. Nothing says rock-n-roll more than actual fire entwined with your tunes!

I didn’t want to try to replicate exactly what he had, and I also wanted to scale things down to be marginally safer. This version can be built from hardware store parts in a very short amount of time…

email readers click here for video

From Caleb Kraft and the marvelous Make. TotH to Bored Panda.

* Max Rockatansky, Mad Max: Fury Road

###

As we fire ’em up, we might send glamorous birthday greetings to Luciana Paluzzi; she was born on this date in 1937.  An actress whose career began with an uncredited walk-on in Three Coins in the Fountain in 1954, she acted in dozens of films, mostly in Italy, until 1965, when she appeared in her best-known role, SPECTRE assassin Fiona Volpe in the fourth James Bond film, Thunderball.  A victim of the “Bond Girl curse,” her best-known role afterwards was probably a tangential turn in Muscle Beach Party.

Luciana Paluzzi/Fiona Volpe

 source

 

Written by LW

June 10, 2015 at 1:01 am

The Sincerest Form of Flattery, Part Three: Got You Covered…

 

Readers will recall Europe’s “The Final Countdown” (brilliantly mashed up with “Smells Like Teen Spirit”); now, via Cover Song Archive (“a collection of songs you know, by people you don’t”)…

 

As we limber our fingers, we might wish an orderly Happy Birthday to agronomy pioneer Jethro Tull; he was born in Basildon in Berkshire on this date in 1674.  While probably best remembered for inventing the horse-drawn plow (around 1701), he is arguably more important for his promotion of sowing seeds in rows rather than “broadcast” (simply throwing them around), so that weeds could be controlled by hoeing regularly between the rows.  To this end, Tull invented a seed drill, which could plant three rows at a time: a  rotary hopper distributed a regulated amount of seed; a blade cut a groove in the ground to receive the seed; then the soil was turned over to cover the sewn seed.  Because of its internal moving parts, the seed drill has been called the first “agricultural machine”; in any case, its rotary mechanism became standard for all sowing devices that followed.

source: Royal Berkshire History

 

%d bloggers like this: