(Roughly) Daily

Posts Tagged ‘Tonight Show

Dancing with scissors…

 

From Brazilian designers 18bis, a very different application of the animation technique– stop motion cut-outs– made famous by South Park:  a beautiful dance inspired by Pablo Neruda’s “The Me Bird,”, set to original music.

[TotH to Wall to Watch]

###

As we contemplate the cornucopia that is construction paper, we might recall that it was on this date in 1962 that Jack Paar said “good night” and signed off of The Tonight Show for the final time.  The late night format had been pioneered by Steve Allen, who inaugurated the slot for NBC locally in New in York in 1952, then as a network offer in 1954.  It was structured as a traditional variety show (though it ran 105 minutes), and was quickly tag-team hosted by Allen and Ernie Kovacs, who alternated nights.  Carried on very few affiliates, it failed to satisfy the network, which switched to a news format in that time slot in January of 1957.  The news was even less popular, so in July of the network tacked back, and named Jack Paar the sole host of Tonight.

Paar established the format and tropes that we currently associate with late night shows:  the opening monologue, the regular cast of sketch and skit players, the catchphrase (“I kid you not”), the musical guests, and most centrally, the interviews with celebrities– of all walks, but largely entertainers.  The toll of doing 105 minutes five nights a week was sufficiently wearing that Paar convinced the network to reduce the length to 90 minutes, and later, to produce only four shows a week (starting the trend of “Best of” Fridays that survived him).  The show was a tremendous hit, steadily building carriage and audience; it was Paar who turned The Tonight Show into an entertainment juggernaut.  But he salted his guest list with intellectuals (Paar helped William F. Buckley become a celebrity), politicians (Sen. John F. Kennedy initiated the practice of the “Presidential candidate appearance” on Paar’s show; see photo below), even world leaders.  Indeed, Paar was the center of a firestorm of criticism for interviewing Fidel Castro in 1959.

Exhausted by demands of the show, Paar left to do a prime time series.  His hand-picked successor, who’d been a frequent substitute host during Paar’s vacations, was Johnny Carson.

 source

 source

 

 

Written by LW

March 29, 2013 at 1:01 am

Fun with Advertising!…

With the perspective of passing time often comes the desire to re-write the past.  Now, as the “Twisted Adverts” Flickr pool demonstrates, one can.

Bobster855 has created and collected dozens of goodies like this re-purposed lawn mower advertisement:

Or this Aunt Jemima spread:

See them all here.

Then, readers who are disposed to do a little revisionist mashing themselves should turn to the hundreds of specimens at The Vintage Ad Browser.  Consider, for example, what one could do with:

Procter & Gamble Co.’s Drene Shampoo (1937)

As we take steps to “control the dialogue,” we might recall that it was on this date in 1952 that NBC TV format pioneer Sylvester L. “Pat” Weaver premiered The Today Show— and introduced the U.S. (and the world, as it turned out) to morning “news.”  Hosts over the years have included John Chancellor, Hugh Downs, Florence Henderson, Barbara Walters, Tom Brokaw, Bryant Gumbel, Jane Pauley, Matt Lauer, and Katie Couric. In 1953, the show also featured a chimpanzee named J. Fred Muggs, who co-hosted with Dave Garroway.  (Weaver also pioneered other important formats– including The Tonight Show–  but is probably better known these days as the father of Signorey Weaver.)

Daughter and Father

%d bloggers like this: