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Posts Tagged ‘MGM

It’s the *pictures* that got small…

Hedy Lamarr, actress and pioneer of spread-spectrum radio transmission

Virginia Postrel reports in Deep Glamour:

A beautiful exhibit of classic Hollywood portraits is currently on display at the National Portrait Gallery in London. (In December, it moves to the Bendigo Art Gallery in Victoria, Australia.) The exhibit, which draws its photos from the John Kobal Collection, originated at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, which provided the images for this slideshow, which originally ran on DG in 2008.

The photos all present idealized versions of the stars–but what a range of ideals they represent, from the refined elegance of Grace Kelly to the sultry seductiveness of Rita Hayworth’s Gilda, from Vivian Leigh in hyperfeminine white ruffles to Marlene Dietrich tough and dominant in a crisp blouse and slacks. And those are just (a few of) the women…

Like Debbie Reynolds’s late-lamented costume collection, the John Kobal Collection originated with MGM’s mother of all garage sales. In the ’60s and ’70s, when Golden Age glamour was out of fashion and studios were dumping their archives, Kobal bought and preserved prints and negatives, befriended aging stars and photographers, and documented their stories. Most of the classic images you see reproduced today come from his archives…

Marlon Brando, actor and activist

More images at Deep Glamour.

As we strike our poses, we might recall that it was on this date in 1956 that High Society opened in movie theaters across the U.S.  It was the last film made by Grace Kelly, who had married Prince Ranier of Monaco months before the premiere.  It was a questionable note– a remake (of The Philadelphia Story)– on which to retire… but it did feature music and lyrics by Cole Porter.

Grace Kelly, just before she became Princess Consort of Monaco

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I’m so Glad(well)…

Readers can create their own best-sellers at The Malcolm Gladwell Book Generator.

[TotH to the wonderful Pop Loser]

As we decide what to do with our royalties, we might recall that it was on this date in 1940 that MGM’s first Tom and Jerry cartoon, “Puss Gets the Boot,” premiered; the inter-species couple would go on to “star” in over 100 more cartoons.  It was the first collaboration between William Hanna and Joseph Barbera (founding a partnership that would last over 50 years and yield such treasures as The Flintstones, Huckleberry Hound, The Jetsons, Scooby-Doo, Top Cat, and Yogi Bear); at over nine minutes in length, it’s the longest T&J ever produced– and the first of three T&J essays (with “Puss n’ Toots” and “Puss ‘n’ Boats”) to pun it’s title on the fairy tale “Puss in Boots.”  “Puss Gets the Boot” was nominated for an Academy Award– the first of Hanna and Barbera’s many Oscar nominations.

The cat in “Puss Gets the Boot” was actually named “Jasper”; the mouse, “Jinx.”  But when the pilot got the go-ahead to become a series, animator John Carr won a studio-wide naming contest with his suggestion: “Tom and Jerry.”  Jasper’s owner, “Mammy Two-Shoes,” was voiced by June Foray— who later earned immortality as the voice of Rocky J. Squirrel.

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