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Posts Tagged ‘Spiro Agnew

As we prepare for Holiday travel…

 

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“Pilots and co-pilots on many airlines are required to eat different meals to minimize the effects of food poisoning if it should occur…”  Says it all.

[TotH to DoobyBrain]

 

As we unwrap the food that we carried on, we might recall that it was on this date in 1970 that The President met The King: Richard M. Nixon welcomed Elvis Presley into the Oval Office.  Two days after meeting Vice President Spiro Agnew in Palm Springs, Presley flew to D.C., and headed unannounced to the White House (with two bodyguards), where he presented the Marine guard with a hand-written letter to Nixon offering his services in the War on Drugs.   The leatherneck got permission to admit The King, but having recognized him, apparently didn’t search him:  on meeting Nixon, Presley pulled out an antique Colt .45 which he presented to the President as a token of his commitment to the cause.  Some weeks later, Nixon offered Presley an official position in the Administration’s anti-drug campaign.

Six and a half years later, Presley died of heart failure, attributed by the coroner’s report to “undetermined causes.”  It’s widely believed, however, that his death was caused by a lethal mix of a variety of prescription drugs and obesity.

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Written by LW

December 21, 2011 at 1:01 am

Infographics to live by…

 

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[TotH to KJMc]

 

As we consider ourselves handy, we might recall that it was on this date in 1969 that Spiro T. Agnew, then Richard Nixon’s Vice President, emerged as the face of the Administration’s aggressive “best defense is a good offense” strategy of response to critics.

Agnew had already given other tough speeches, lambasting “liberal intellectuals” and labeling anti-Vietnam War protestors “impudent snobs.”  But 42 years ago on this date, Agnew delivered a talk in Des Moines, written for him by Nixon’s own speech writer, Patrick Buchanan, blasting the national news media– the television networks– as an unelected elite with “a virtual monopoly of a whole medium of communication.”  The wide coverage of his talk encouraged Agnew to amp up the invective; thus, subsequent speeches gave the language such phrases as “nattering nabobs of negativism.”

Agnew relished his celebrity, and was tolerated in it by Nixon:  as the clouds of Watergate gathered, Agnew was, Nixon noted, “impeachment insurance”; no one, Nixon believed, wanted to remove him if it meant elevating Agnew to the presidency.  And indeed, the U.S. Senate’s history site suggests, it was effective insurance… at least, until Agnew was caught up in a bribery and corruption scandal dating from his days as a Maryland politician, and was forced to resign as part of his plea deal.

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Written by LW

November 13, 2011 at 1:01 am

Seeing what one wants to see…

Readers will recall that (R)D has pondered the implications of digitally-manipulated photographs before. (C.F. e.g., “The eyes have it…” or “Now you see it…“)

Well, researchers at Tsinghua University in China have have upped the ante– they have developed a technique that converts hand-drawn sketches into seamless photomontages composed of images found on the web:

See more examples (including a video demo), and download the paper they presented at SIGGRAPH, here.

As we pretend to be tabloid photo editors, we might recall that it was on this date in 1970 that Vice President Spiro T. Agnew gave in to the Nattering Nabobs of Negativism (and to charges of extortion, tax fraud, bribery and conspiracy) and resigned.

source: Hudson Library and Historical Archives

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