(Roughly) Daily

Posts Tagged ‘record

“If the people of New Zealand want to be part of our world, I believe they should hop off their islands, and push ’em closer”*…

 

 

World Maps Without New Zealand is a stupid side project an attempt to raise the awareness of a very serious and troubling issue we are seeing taking place all around the world: the disrespectful cartographical neglect towards the country that gave you such amazing things as Lord of the Rings, Flight of the Conchords, Lorde, and ZORB. Here, we collect and share the real world examples of this atrocity.

The blog is curated by this guy, who is a humble Auckland based web developer by day, and an extra lazy one by night…

Many, many more at “World Maps Without New Zealand“–“It’s not a very important country most of the time…”

* Lewis Black

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As we get antipodeal, we might recall that it was on this date in 1954, at an athletics meeting in Gisborne (New Zealand), that Yvette Williams broke the long jump record held by Dutch athlete Francine Blankers-Koen.  Williams record of 20 feet 7½ inches (6.29 m) stood for another 18 months.

Williams had already achieved international recognition by winning Gold in the Long Jump event at the at the 1950 Commonwealth Games and at the Helsinki Olympics in 1952.  She took Gold again at the Commonwealth Games later in 1954, but did not surpass her own record.  She was inducted into the New Zealand Hall of Fame in 1990.

Williams, mid-jump

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Written by LW

February 20, 2015 at 1:01 am

“There must be quite a few things that a hot bath won’t cure, but I don’t know many of them”*…

 

New York Knicks power forward Amar’e Stoudemire let the world in on his body-rejuvenating beauty secret via Instagram as this year’s NBA season began: red wine baths… The 31-year-old basketball veteran is soaking his muscles in a blend of vino and water to “create more circulation” in his red blood cells. In addition to red wine, Stoudemire takes a dip in an “ancient tub,” a cold-plunge pool, and tops off his spa session with a massage.

But before you start dumping Two Buck Chuck into your tub, Regine Berthelot, a vinotherapist and treatment manager for Caudalíe Spas in North America, Brazil, and Hong Kong, says that bathing in booze will actually dehydrate your skin. Instead, it’s the extract from the red vine leaf that is shown to strengthen capillaries, stimulate blood flow, and detox the body—a cup of which is incorporated into the Red Vine Barrel Bath ($75) at the brand’s spa at The Plaza in New York City. Polyphenols and resveratrol (a molecule deemed as one of the most powerful antiagers by professor David Sinclair at Harvard Medical School) are other trace elements that can be found in this treatment, although Berthelot says higher concentrations of both ingredients can be found in a simple glass of wine…

While one hopes that Stoudemire found the soak soothing, one notes that that Knocks are in the midst of a disastrous season (8-37 so far, with a franchise record 16b games loosing streak…

Still, readers who want more information can find it at “Why Drink Red Wine When You Can Bathe in It.”

* Sylvia Plath

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As we practice three-pointers, we might recall that it was on this date in 1973 that UCLA’s basketball team won its 61st consecutive games, an NCAA record, on the way to an undeafeated season and a record 89 wins (and 1 loss) over a three-year span.  The Bruins won a(nother) National Championship that season.

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Written by LW

January 27, 2015 at 1:01 am

“That’s All Folks!”*…

 

If you drink two ounces of Windex glass cleaner within an hour you’ll be drunk. Fourteen ounces will shut down your nervous system. 

You can poison yourself with water: drink over a gallon in an hour and you’ll be irritable, drowsy, suffering from a headache, and behaving strangely. If you consume another three quarters of a gallon in that hour, your nervous system will shut down

From carrots and chewing gum to Pantene hairspray and Centrum vitamins– “How Not To Kill Yourself With Household Items.”

Epitaph of Mel Blanc, “The Man of a Thousand Voices.”

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As we practice the precautionary principle, we might recall that it was on this date in 1959 that Alfred “Alf” Dean, fishing in south Australian waters, used a rod and reel to land the largest great white shark recognized by the International Game Fish Association (IGFA).  Weighing 1,208 kilograms (2,664 lb), it was 16′ 10″ long.

Several larger great whites caught by anglers have since been verified, but were later disallowed from formal recognition by IGFA monitors for rules violations– the most common of which rule violation is using mammals as bait…  which Mr. Dean apparently also did (“I used kittens”).  But at the time of his catch this practice was not against IGFA rules, so his record stood.

Dean and his catch

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Written by LW

April 21, 2014 at 1:01 am

Significance is where you find it…

 

 At CoolSerialNumbers.com, Nashville musician and currency collector Dave Undis brings together like-minded digit-heads who have little interest in the history of money or even the denomination of a given note. Instead they are after certain patterns and series that fall under the flexible heading of “fancy” serial numbers.

Low serial numbers, from 00000001 to 00000100, are sought after, as well as palindromes (23599532), solids (with a digit that repeats eight times), seven-of-a-kinds (66666665), ladders (45678901) and important dates (12071941). The criteria get even more obscure from there: Undis is seeking a pi note, with the number 31415927. But the more apparently jumbled the digits, the less likely it is that anyone with the bill in their wallet will ever notice.

Which is too bad when you consider how much these fancy numbers can sell for—quite a bit more than the bill’s face value, in some cases. Right now, on Undis’ website, you can buy a $1 bill with the serial number 00000002 for a whopping $2,500. If that sounds like chump change, consider that a $5 bill with the number 33333333 goes for $13,000.

You can also peruse the Cool Serial Numbers collection, displayed via Google+, and get a sense for how oddly soothing a row of zeros can be, although “radar repeaters” have an interesting effect of their own, and who could resist collecting the elegant numbers of the Fibonacci sequence?…

Read all about it at “A ‘fancy’ serial number can make a $1 bill worth thousands.”

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As we comb through our currency, we might recall that it was on this date in 1920, his first season with the New York Yankees (after being traded from the Red Sox), that Babe Ruth hit a record 54th home run.   While seven years later Ruth raised the record to 60– a mark only topped in 1961 by Roger Maris– it was this first year in pin stripes that changed baseball forever:  at Boston, Ruth had been a starting pitcher; but the Yankees moved him to right field, making him a regular hitter.  And hit he did.  Ruth ushered in the “live-ball era” of the sport, as his big swing led to rising home run totals that thrilled fans, but more fundamentally helped baseball evolve from a low-scoring, speed-dominated contest to a high-scoring power game.

And, of course, he did it without the aid of modern performance enhancements… just cigars and booze.

Ruth in 1920

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Written by LW

September 29, 2013 at 1:01 am

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