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Posts Tagged ‘World Trade Center

“Meanwhile, fears of universal disaster sank to an all time low over the world”*…

 

Tsunami #8 Indonesia

New York photographer Sasha Bezzubov uses a variety of conceptual methods to point viewers to larger phenomena that underlie visible landscapes…  Bezzubov’s series Things Fall Apart (2001-07), depicts the aftermath of natural disasters in India, Indonesia, Thailand and the United States. The pictures function in part as documents of these tragic events, but the series as a whole does not convey enough specific information to be useful as documentary work. Rather, the images blend together to form a more generalized, and aestheticized, portrayal of destruction, following the long artistic tradition of appreciating the melancholy beauty of ruins and nature’s destructive power. That tradition is closely tied to the idea of the sublime — a sensation of beauty and terror in the face of nature’s power — prevalent in 18th and early 19th century philosophy and landscape art, and often understood as a way of experiencing the divine. Nature’s power is certainly evident in Bezzubov’s images, but the knowledge that human-caused climate change has increased the frequency and strength of catastrophic storms reshapes our sense of the sublime…

Hurricane #4, Florida

Read more at Design Observer

* Isaac Asimov

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As we take stock, we might recall that it was on this date in 1993 that the World Trade Center in New York was attacked for the first time:  a nitrate-hydrogen truck bomb was detonated below the North Tower.  The blast shook the 110 story tower, causing the collapse of several floors in the underground garage, and tore a hole in the ceiling of an adjoining subway; six people were killed, another thousand, injured.  The attack is believed to have been planned by Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, a member of what we now know as al-Qaeda, and was executed by a group who were apprehended, tried, and convicted the following year.

Underground damage after the bombing

source

 

Written by LW

February 26, 2014 at 1:01 am

Please, Dad! Please read the one where the plague victim gets caught in the hurricane and is crushed by a tree…

From the ever-illuminating Ten Zen Monkeys, “The Most Depressing Children’s Books Ever Written“…  Consider, for example, #5:

Andrea Patel, a Massachusetts schoolteacher– and pastry chef, and musician– represents the earth as a big blue circle of tissue paper, then writes “One day a terrible thing happened,” as a big red splotch appears on that circle.

“The world, which had been blue and green and bright and very big and really round and pretty peaceful, got badly hurt.

“Many people were injured. Many other people died. And everyone was sad.”

Then she tries explaining terrorism to children — using more tissue paper collages. There’s a tornado, an earthquake, and a fire — all bad things that happen naturally. “But sometimes bad things happen because people act in mean ways and hurt each other on purpose,” she writes. “That’s what happened on that day, a day when it felt like the world broke.” Then there’s a picture of the pieces of the world blowing away and drifting across the blank whiteness of the next page…

The book was finished within weeks of the September 11 attacks, and Patel donated all the book’s proceeds to a 9/11 charity, but the whole exercise is still a little disturbing. People fumbled for the right response to the terrorist attacks, and in the end, this is probably Patel’s most inadvertently honest sentence.

“This is scary, and hard to understand, even for grown-ups.”

One should steel oneself, then find them all here.


As wonder whatever became of Tom Terrific
, we might recall that it was on this date in 1584 that Sir Walter Raleigh was granted a Royal Patent by his Patron Elizabeth I to colonize Virginia.

Raleigh

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