(Roughly) Daily

Posts Tagged ‘Satori Kato

“My favorite food from my homeland is Guinness. My second choice is Guinness. My third choice – would have to be Guinness.”*…

As Will O’Brien explains, Ireland’s most famous brewery has been ahead of the curve for 250 years…

Taken over its entire history, Guinness may just be the most successful company Ireland has ever produced. In 1930, it was the seventh largest company in Britain or Ireland. It is one of our oldest companies of note. Considering that it predates the Bank of Ireland and the State itself, it could even be said that Guinness is the longest-running successful large institution in Ireland.

The key to Guinness’ robustness has been innovation. Through a series of key innovations, Guinness was able to stay on top despite (among other things) a famine, mass emigration, two World Wars, a civil war, and the changeover from British to sovereign rule. Guinness is responsible for changes in workplace relations, several foundational advances in the physics of brewing, and even the famous Student’s t-test in statistics. Indeed, Guinness has been one of the key drivers of innovation in Ireland.

A determined founder began Guinness with a vision and took a bold decision with a 9000-year lease. The company then started a brewery which defied nearly every norm in workplace relations. They used the scientific method to radically rethink how beer is brewed and served, and created a world-class brand & marketing operation.

When Guinness released a subtly different pint glass several years ago, traditionalists decried it as blasphemous. The irony is that the brewery that creates this drink has eschewed tradition for over 250 years…

Lessons are where one finds them: “No Great Stagnation in Guinness,” from @willobri.

* Peter O’Toole

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As we contemplate continuity, we might recall that it was on this date in 1903 that the first U.S. patent for instant coffee (No. 735,777) was issued to Satori Kato of Chicago, Illinois. The application was filed in April of 1901, when his Kato Coffee Company introduced the product at the Pam-American Exposition in Buffalo.

A brochure for the Kato Coffee Company, from the 1901 Pan-American Exposition

source

Written by (Roughly) Daily

August 11, 2022 at 7:59 am

Some things change; some things stay the same…

xkcd

Today’s street prices on TI Graphing Calculators: $100-220.  One notes the irony that TI is widely credited with having pioneered the strategy of pricing to the learning curve.

As we lament the captive market created by the prevalence of the SAT and AP exams, we might recall that it was on this date in 1938 that Nescafé instant coffee was introduced in Switzerland by the Nestlé company (inpart, motivated by the need to help the Brazilian government solve its coffee surplus problem.

Instant coffee was invented in 1901 by Satori Kato, a Japanese scientist working in Chicago. Kato introduced the powdered potion in Buffalo, New York, at the Pan-American Exposition. George Constant Louis Washington developed his own instant coffee process shortly thereafter, and first marketed it commercially (~1910).

But Nestlé improved the production process: they created their Instant coffee with a blend of beans, mixed in a drum, roasted and ground, then brewed in huge percolators, sprayed into a heated stainless steel dryer to remove all water, and finally packed as the small, dry granules now so well known.

Spray-Process Instant Coffee

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