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“If you are not completely confused by quantum mechanics, you do not understand it”*…

 

uchicagoscie

 

If we can harness it, quantum technology promises fantastic new possibilities. But first, scientists need to coax quantum systems to stay yoked for longer than a few millionths of a second.

A team of scientists at the University of Chicago’s Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering announced the discovery of a simple modification that allows quantum systems to stay operational—or “coherent”—10,000 times longer than before. Though the scientists tested their technique on a particular class of quantum systems called solid-state qubits, they think it should be applicable to many other kinds of quantum systems and could thus revolutionize quantum communication, computing and sensing…

Down at the level of atoms, the world operates according to the rules of quantum mechanics—very different from what we see around us in our daily lives. These different rules could translate into technology like virtually unhackable networks or extremely powerful computers; the U.S. Department of Energy released a blueprint for the future quantum internet in an event at UChicago on July 23. But fundamental engineering challenges remain: Quantum states need an extremely quiet, stable space to operate, as they are easily disturbed by background noise coming from vibrations, temperature changes or stray electromagnetic fields.

Thus, scientists try to find ways to keep the system coherent as long as possible…

“This breakthrough lays the groundwork for exciting new avenues of research in quantum science,” said study lead author David Awschalom, the Liew Family Professor in Molecular Engineering, senior scientist at Argonne National Laboratory and director of the Chicago Quantum Exchange. “The broad applicability of this discovery, coupled with a remarkably simple implementation, allows this robust coherence to impact many aspects of quantum engineering. It enables new research opportunities previously thought impractical.”…

Very big news at a very small scale: “Scientists discover way to make quantum states last 10,000 times longer.”

*John Wheeler

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As we strive for stability, we might send calculated birthday greetings to Brook Taylor; he was born on this date in 1685.  A mathematician, he is best known for his work in describing and understanding oscillation.  In 1708, Taylor produced a solution to the problem of the center of oscillation.  His Methodus incrementorum directa et inversa (“Direct and Indirect Methods of Incrementation,” 1715) introduced what is now called the calculus of finite differences.  Using this, he was the first to express mathematically the movement of a vibrating string on the basis of mechanical principles.  Methodus also contained Taylor’s theorem, later recognized by Joseph Lagrange as the basis of differential calculus.

A gifted artist, Taylor also wrote on the basic principles of perspective, including the first general treatment of the principle of vanishing points.

220px-BTaylor source

 

 

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