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Posts Tagged ‘Hieronymus Bosch

“Ipse dixit, et facta sunt: ipse mandāvit, et creāta sunt”*…

 

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The Bosch Parade is a (mostly) bi-annual event– “a theatrical and musical art spectacle on water,” “a parade floating by”– held in the Netherlands to celebrate the “symbolism, fantasies and absurdities” that make the work of Hieronymus Bosch, especially his The Garden of Earthly Delights, so striking.

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The 2019 edition featured 14 separate tableaux, including those pictured here.

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For more, visit “A Parade of Earthly Delights: Floating Bosch Parade Celebrates Painter Hieronymus Bosch in Spectacular Aquatic Event.”

* from Psalm 33 (“For he spake and it was done; he commanded, and it stood fast,” the inscription above the figure of God on an exterior panel of Bosch’s The Garden of Earthly Delights

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As we get wet, we might send exquisitely-rendered birthday greeting to Kanō Tan’yū; he was born on this date in 1602.  A master of the the Kanō school of Japanese painting, he was the foremost painter of his time, and the creator of many of the most famous and widely known Kanō works.

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A 1672 work by Tan’yū

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Portrait of the artist, attributed to pupil Momoda Ryūei

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“Thou art a very ragged Wart”*…

 

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Few painters have created as rich a world as Hieronymus Bosch did in The Garden of Earthly Delights. The late 15th- or early 16th-century triptych, which depicts the creation of man, the licentious frolicking of all creatures on a paradisiacal Earth, and the subsequent fall into damnation, draws a scrutiny — and causes an amusement — as intense as ever…

Bosch not only created a world with The Garden of Earthly Delights, he populated it thoroughly. And despite the human-centric story the work appears to take as its basis, the cast with which it retells it extends far beyond mere humanity: the panels feature not just wildlife of all shapes and sizes but a variety of mythical grotesques, from imps to chimeras to hybrids of man and animal to much more besides. He drew from the same surreal imaginative well to fill his other paintings, and you can now pull out a few of these colorful, menacing, preposterous, and darkly humorous characters yourself in collectible figurine form…

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More (including a link to the figurines) at “Hieronymus Bosch Figurines: Collect Surreal Characters from Bosch’s Paintings & Put Them on Your Bookshelf.” [TotH to Mark S]

You can also take a virtual tour of the painting (there’s even an app for it), see it brought to life with modern animation, and hear the song tattooed on the posterior of one of the work’s many characters.

See also: “Bosch is great because what he imagines in color can be translated into justice.”

* Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part 2

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As we get weird, we might recall that it was on this date in 1859 that Jean-Francois Gravelet (stage name, Charles Blondin) became the first person to cross Niagara Falls on a tightrope. Then he did it again.

On the morning of June 30, 1859, about 25,000 thrill-seekers arrived by train and steamer and dispersed on the American or Canadian side of the falls, the latter said to have the better view. Both banks grew “fairly black” with swarms of spectators, among them statesmen, judges, clerics, generals, members of Congress, capitalists, artists, newspaper editors, professors, debutantes, salesmen and hucksters. Vendors hawked everything from lemonade to whiskey, and Colcord gave tours to the press, explaining the logistics of what the Great Blondin was about to attempt.

A light rope, not even an inch thick, had been attached to one end of his hempen cable so it could be conveyed across the Niagara River. On the American side the cable was wound around the trunk of an oak tree in White’s Pleasure Grounds, but securing it on the Canadian side presented a problem. Blondin’s assistants feared that the light rope wouldn’t bear the weight of the cable as it was drawn up the gorge for anchorage in Canada, but the rope dancer, to the delight of his audience, executed a daring solution.

After tying another rope around his waist, he rappelled 200 feet on the small rope, attached the second rope to the end of the cable, and then blithely climbed back to Canadian ground and secured the cable to a rock. To prevent swaying, guy ropes ran from the cable at 20-foot intervals to posts on both banks, creating the effect of a massive spider web. Blondin could do nothing, however, about the inevitable sag in its center, approximately 50 feet of cable to which it was impossible to fasten guy ropes. At that spot, in the middle of his crossing, he would be only 190 feet above the gorge. “There were hundreds of people examining the rope,” reported one witness, “and, with scarcely an exception, they all declared the inability of M. Blondin to perform the feat, the incapacity of the rope to sustain him, and that he deserved to be dashed to atoms for his desperate fool-hardiness.”

Shortly before 5 p.m., Blondin took his position on the American side, dressed in pink tights bedecked with spangles. The lowering sun made him appear as if clothed in light. He wore fine leather shoes with soft soles and brandished a balancing pole made of ash, 26 feet long and weighing nearly 50 pounds. Slowly, calmly, he started to walk. “His gait,” one man noted, “was very like the walk of some barnyard cock.” Children clung to their mothers’ legs; women peeked from behind their parasols. Several onlookers fainted. About a third of the way across, Blondin shocked the crowd by sitting down on his cable and calling for the Maid of the Mist, the famed tourist vessel, to anchor momentarily beneath him. He cast down a line and hauled up a bottle of wine. He drank and started off again, breaking into a run after he passed the sagging center. While the band played “Home, Sweet Home,” Blondin reached Canada. One man helped pull him ashore and exclaimed, “I wouldn’t look at anything like that again for a million dollars.”

After 20 minutes of rest Blondin began the journey to the other side, this time with a Daguerreotype camera strapped to his back. He advanced 200 feet, affixed his balancing pole to the cable, untied his load, adjusted it in front of him and snapped a likeness of the crowd along the American side. Then he hoisted the camera back into place and continued on his way. The entire walk from bank to bank to bank took 23 minutes, and Blondin immediately announced an encore performance to take place on the Fourth of July…  [source]

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Blondin and his camera, as rendered in “Blondin: His Life and Performances.” [source]

 

“Bosch is great because what he imagines in color can be translated into justice”*…

 

Detail from the left panel of The Garden of Earthly Delights depicting the paradise of the Garden of Eden

Further to a relatively recent post on Hieronymous Bosch:

I recently traveled to the small Dutch town of Den Bosch to The Noordbrabants Museum to see the largest assembly of work by Hieronymus Bosch ever assembled,Jheronimus Bosch: Visions of Genius. This town was where Bosch spent his entire life—he lived on one side of the square and worked in his studio on the other. I took a guided tour of the Museum (big thanks to Heidi Vandamme and Tamsin Aarts-Pickard at the museum and to Sander Knol at Xander Uitgevers, my book publisher in Holland!), and afterward I wrote down what I remembered. Needless to say the show is hugely popular—The Guardian called it “one of the most important exhibitions of our time”—and I think it’s fantastic…it’s a window into another world and another time…

From David Byrne, “11 Things I Learned from the Hieronymous Bosch Show.”

* Edward Dahlberg

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As we tend our gardens, we might send edgy birthday greetings to Christopher Lee “Chris” Burden; he was born on this date in 1946.  An artist working in performance, sculpture and installation art, his work is collected in the LACMA and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Tate Gallery, London; the Middelheimmuseum, Antwerp, Belgium; the Inhotim Centro de Arte Contemporanea, Brazil; the 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa, Japan; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, among others. And he has been celebrated in the lyrics of songs by David Bowie (“Joe the Lion”) and Laurie Anderson (“It’s Not the Bullet that Kills You – It’s the Hole [for Chris Burden]”).

Metropolis II (2011) kinetic art project by Chris Burden. At LACMA, filmed March 16, 2013.

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Written by LW

April 11, 2016 at 1:01 am

“And what is the potential man, after all? Is he not the sum of all that is human?”*…

 

Early Netherlandish painter Hieronymus Bosch’s visionary triptych, The Garden of Earthly Delights, has stoked discussion since it was completed (sometime between 1490 and 1510); critics and scholars have confidently proclaimed it everything from a “didactic warning on the perils of life’s temptations” to an “erotic derangement that turns us all into voyeurs, a place filled with the intoxicating air of perfect liberty”… occasionally both.

Photographer Lori Pond was moved to incorporate Bosch’s vision into her own photographic work after she visited the Prado in Madrid, where his masterpiece has been on display since 1939.

After an emotional reaction to the painting and its mythologized mysteriousness, Pond decided to create a series of photos based on Bosch’s work — isolating details from Earthly Delights, as well as The Temptation of St. Anthony, and The Last Judgment.

The photos themselves look like they could be more minimalistic paintings by Bosch, but the arrangements you see were mostly achieved in-camera. Pond used materials gathered from swap meets, and enlisted the help of a motley team made up of a taxidermist, a prosthetics designer, her friends, and their closets…

More examples from Pond’s portfolio at Bosch Redux on her site; more back ground at “Arresting Photographs Remake Images From Hieronymus Bosch’s Grotesque Biblical Fantasies” and “Recreating Hieronymus Bosch.”

Then wander over explore the wonderful interactive documentary “Hieronymus Bosch, The Garden of Delights” (part of the transmedia tryptich: this interactive documentary, the documentary film “Hieronymus Bosch, touched by the devil,” and the Virtual Reality documentary “Hieronymus Bosch, the Eyes of the Owl,” coming this April).

And finally, check out the “newest” Bosch painting, recently (re-)discovered.

* Hieronymus Bosch

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As we follow in St. Augustine in praying that God grant us “chastity and continence, but not yet,”  we might send modern birthday greetings to Joseph Fernand Henri Léger; he was born on this date in 1881.  Best known as member of the Cubist movement (in which he was unique for his use of cylindrical shapes, earning him the label “tubist”), Léger was also sculptor and filmmaker.  Indeed, in his later life, he added book illustration, mural creation, stained-glass and mosaic work, and set and costume design to his repertoire.  In those later years, his gravitated to modern subject matter, which he treated in simple, bold, and accessible ways– for which he’s now considered an important forerunner of Pop Art.

Léger’s Nudes in the Forest (Nus dans la forêt), 1910

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Written by LW

February 4, 2016 at 1:01 am

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