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Posts Tagged ‘Where’s Waldo

Beyond Waldo…

Now that Waldo‘s whereabouts are pretty much common knowledge, the search is on for The Macho Man himself– Randy Savage…

Oh so many more at Where’s Randy Savage?

As we revel in radical juxtaposition, we might recall that it was on this date in 1784 that John Wesley chartered the first Methodist Church in America.  An Oxford-educated Anglican priest, Wesley had developed a brand of evangelism that offended many traditional Anglicans, but that found legions of followers in England, Scotland, Wales, Ireland, and then in the Americas– all under the Anglican umbrella…  until 1784, when the Anglican church refused to ordain Dr. Thomas Coke to preach to Americans newly independent from the British State Church, finally forcing Wesley to create the Methodist Church separately and to do the ordination himself.

George Romney’s portrait of John Wesley (source)

Exactly 209 years later, on this date in 1993, agents of the U.S. Treasury Department’s Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms (ATF) raided the Waco, Texas compound of the Branch Davidians, a “reform movement” that began within the Seventh-Day Adventist Church around 1930.  An extended gun battle ensued, followed by a 50-day siege that ended in another exchange of gunfire and a fire within the compound.  In the end, four ATF agents were dead and 15 wounded; Branch Davidian leader David Koresh was killed, along with 82 of his followers.

The Branch Davidian Compound in flames (source)

Twas the Night Before Christmas: The Art House Edition…

Clement Clarke Moore’s famous poem, originally entitled “A Visit From St. Nicholas,” has been a Christmas staple since it’s publication (in The New York Sentinel) on December 23, 1823.  But it has surely never been as deeply explored nor as richly interpreted as by the director of Caves Of Forgotten Dreams, Encounters At The End Of The World, and Grizzly Man:

Readers might also enjoy Germany’s cinematic treasure reading Curious George, Where’s Waldo, and Madeline… just visit Ryan Iverson’s “Stupid is the New Awesome” channel on You Tube.

As we sigh at the Existential ennui of it all, we might recall that it was exactly 90 years later– on this date in 1913– that Arthur Wynne’s “word-cross,” the first crossword puzzle, was published in the New York World:

2-3.    What bargain hunters enjoy.        6-22.    What we all should be.
4-5.    A written acknowledgment.         4-26.    A day dream.
6-7.    Such and nothing more.                2-11.    A talon.
10-11.    A bird.                                            19-28.    A pigeon.
14-15.    Opposed to less.                           F-7.    Part of your head.
18-19.    What this puzzle is.                     23-30.    A river in Russia.
22-23.    An animal of prey.                      1-32.    To govern.
26-27.    The close of a day.                      33-34.    An aromatic plant.
28-29.    To elude.                                      N-8.    A fist.
30-31.    The plural of is.                           24-31.    To agree with.
8-9.    To cultivate.                                     3-12.    Part of a ship.
12-13.    A bar of wood or iron.                20-29.    One.
16-17.    What artists learn to do.            5-27.    Exchanging.
20-21.    Fastened.                                      9-25.    To sink in mud.
24-25.    Found on the seashore.             13-21.    A boy.
10-18.    The fibre of the gomuti palm.

solution (source)

Waldo, found…

©2009 ~sfumato21

(via Daily What)

As we call off the dogs, we might recall that it was reputedly on this date in 1675 that Gottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz first used the “long s” as the integral symbol in calculus:

It was understood to be Leibnitz’s co-option of the Latin “summa.”

When Newton and Leibniz first published their versions of calculus (in the late 1680s), there was tremendous controversy over which mathematician (and therefore which country, England or Germany) deserved credit.  Newton derived his results first, but Leibniz published first.  The prickly Newton claimed Leibniz had stolen ideas from Newton’s unpublished notes, which Newton had shared with a few members of the Royal Society; a bitter argument ensued, dividing English-speaking mathematicians from continental mathematicians for many years– much to the detriment of English mathematics.   A careful examination of the papers of Leibniz and Newton has convinced scholars that the two arrived at their results independently, with Leibniz starting with integration; and Newton, with differentiation.  It was the symbolically-gifted Leibniz, however, who gave this new branch of mathematics its name.  Newton called his version of calculus the “the science of fluxions”…  One shudders to imagine that on one’s textbook (or in the mouths of schoolchildren…)

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Written by (Roughly) Daily

October 26, 2009 at 12:01 am

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