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Posts Tagged ‘Pirandello

“This is one of those cases in which the imagination is baffled by the facts”*…

 

FCC

A couple of years ago we visited Little Sis (the opposite of Big Brother)– “Those in power must spend a lot of time laughing at us“…  The site has added a nifty new feature, Oligrapher, a tool for visualizing networks of influence using LittleSis data.

Map your own webs of power.

* Adam Smith

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As we we note again that it’s all about who you know, we might wish a Buon Compleanno to Luigi Pirandello, the dramatist and novelist best remembered for Six Characters in Search of an Author.  He was born on this date in 1867, turned to writing when the family sulphur mines failed, and received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1934.

The Author, Found

Written by LW

June 28, 2016 at 1:01 am

All together now!…

The good folks at All Sorts have taken on the issue of collective nouns– or as Drew Neil calls them, Venereal Terms— that is, the names we give bunches of things.  All Sorts invited designers to submit illustrations of their favorites for inclusion in the All Sorts Index.   A few of the winners:

A Glass Half Full of Optimists

A Hush of Librarians

A Sofa of Dogs

For more karass, not false but funny, see here. (TotH to Jason Kottke)

As we contemplate commonalities, we might wish a Buon Compleanno to Luigi Pirandello, the dramatist and novelist best remembered for Six Characters in Search of an Author.  He was born on this date in 1867, turned to writing when the family sulphur mines failed, and received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1934.

The Author, Found

It’s turtles all the way up…

If it can be stacked, piled, or otherwise placed one piece atop another, you’ll find it at MMMMound.

As we work against wobble, we might recall that it was on this date, in 1927 that Luigi Pirandello’s Sei Personaggi in Cerca d’Autore (Six Characters in Search of an Author) premiered…  430 years to the day after his countryman Amerigo Vespucci may have set sail the first time in search of the New World (1497)…  historians disagree on whether or not Vespucci actually made that voyage;  but they concur that he introduced the European public to the existence of a new land– via widely-circulated letters expressing his belief that the New World was in fact a New World: a new continent (contrary to the beliefs of Columbus and other early sailors West, who believed they were sailing to the far side of the East)… letters that led Martin Waldseemüller to name the new continent “America” on his world map of 1507…

Waldseemüller’s “Universalis Cosmographia,” 1507
the first map to use the name “America”

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