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Posts Tagged ‘food photography

Looking closely. Very closely…

 

Designer Adam Saynuk is a detail guy… and a very fine photographer.  Consider the photographs that he took for The Taco Truck (restaurant/store/food truck in Hoboken, NJ) last year, in which he minutely examined each of 35 ingredients

Tomatoes

Corn Tortillas

See them all here.  And see some of Adam’s other work here.

[TotH to Good]

 

As we resolve to leave our glasses on while eating, we might recall that it was on this date in 1609 that Galileo first demonstrated his telescope.  Earlier that year, while in Venice, he’d heard of “Dutch perspective glass,” which made distant objects appear closer and larger.  He reports that he returned to Padua, made a prototype, then an improved telescope, and returned to Venice– where he presented his invention to the Doge Leonardo Donato, who was sitting in full council. The Doge and Senate were so impressed that they awarded him life tenure for his lectureship at Padua and doubled his salary.

Later that same year, Galileo turned his invention around, and created the precursor of Adam’s favorite optical tool, a compound microscope with a convex and a concave lens.

19th Century painting of Galileo displaying his telescope to Leonardo Donato (source)

 

 

If food be the music of love, play on…

Vanessa Dualib is a Sao Paulo-based “daydreamer, pseudo-photographer, wanna-be astronaut and untrained intellectual who tends to find inspiration specially in fruits and veggies.”  That inspiration found form in her book Playing With Food.

Happily for us, she’s graciously shared the photos that animate her book; they’re available as a photo set, “Playing With My Food” on Flickr.

As we brave the broccoli forest, we might recall that it was on this date in 4004 BC that all creation began…  at least according to what is known as the Ussher Chronology.  Developed  in the 17th century by James Ussher, the Anglican Archbishop of Armagh (in what is now Northern Ireland), it held that the first day of creation began at nightfall, Sunday, October 23, 4004 BC.  Ussher’s conclusions were published in 1650 in his Annales veteris testamenti, a prima mundi origine deducti (Annals of the Old Testament, deduced from the first origins of the world).

Ussher’s specific choice of starting year may have been influenced by the then-widely-held belief that the Earth’s likely “life-span” was 6,000 years (4,000 before the birth of Christ and 2,000 after), corresponding to the six days of Creation, on the grounds that “one day is with the Lord as a thousand years, and a thousand years as one day” (2 Peter 3:8).  In any case, his conclusion varied a bit from other Biblically-based estimates, like those of Bede (3952 BC), Ussher’s near-contemporary Scaliger (3949 BC), Johannes Kepler (3992 BC) and Sir Isaac Newton (c. 4000 BC).

Ironically, it was on this date in 1977 that paleontologist Elso Barghoorn announced the discovery of the oldest life-forms on earth:  3.4-billion-year-old one-celled fossils.

source

 

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