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Posts Tagged ‘Comic book

“There is no ‘ordinary person'”*…

 

Tobar Mayo in Abar, the First Black Superman

As Black Panther continues to slay at the box office, a look at one of that blockbuster’s less well-known– indeed, virtually anonymous– antecedents…

Abar, the First Black Superman is truly a cinematic marvel. It has its heart in the right place and fumbles spectacularly in every way possible—the painfully preachy dialogue, the scrappy special effects, the too long running time. But even if it’s not anywhere close to the achievement of Black Panther, it’s a fascinating product of the time and more proof that black superheroes have long existed outside the Marvel universe. And just like Black Panther, their superpowers are almost always political…

An extraordinary story: “One of Cinema’s First Black Superheroes Is Not Who You Think It Is.”

* “The disciplines of physical exercise, meditation and study aren’t terribly esoteric. The means to attain a capability far beyond that of the so-called ordinary person are within the reach of everyone, if their desire and their will are strong enough. I have studied science, art, religion and a hundred different philosophies. Anyone could do as much. By applying what you learn and ordering your thoughts in an intelligent manner it is possible to accomplish almost anything. Possible for an ‘ordinary person.’ There’s a notion I’d like to see buried: the ordinary person. Ridiculous. There is no ‘ordinary person’.”   – that most super of superheroes, Ozymandias, in Alan Moore’s Watchmen

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As we don our capes, we might recall that it was on this date in 1935 that America was introduced to Little Lulu (in the February 23 issue of The Saturday Evening Post), appearing as a flower girl at a wedding and mischievously strewing the aisle with banana peels.   Created by Marjorie Henderson Buell (whose work appeared under the name “Marge”), Little Lulu ran as a regular panel in the Post through 1944; then as a comic book and a comic strip into the 1980s.  She also appeared in a series of animated theatrical cartoons and in a number of TV series and specials.

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Written by LW

February 23, 2018 at 1:01 am

Got you covered…

With thanks to reader RS, a terrific post from STWALLSKULL, in honor of Banned Book Week (celebrated here), highlighting the covers of a number of comic books called out by Frederic Wertham in his inflamatory book Seduction of the Innocent, which led to the “Comics Code”– and the banning of several series.

There are some not-so-surprising entries, e.g.:

… and then, some real stoppers:

Read the entire post for the cautionary tale that it is.

As we rinse the ink from our fingers, we might spare a thought for Charles Darwin, who reached James Island (now better known as Santiago Island) in the Galapagos Archipelago on the H.M.S. Beagle on this date in 1835…

James Island as it might have appeared to Darwin as he approached

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Where there is darkness, only light…

When the going gets tough, the tough get macabre…  so it’s a delight to find a rich collection of the works of Charles Addams at Golden Age Comic Book Stories…  The “father of the Addams Family” has never been more timely.

As we sneak a peek back over our our shoulders, we might recall that it was on this date in 1948 that Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein (featuring Bela Lugosi as Dracula!) opened— and re-established the dynamic duo as stars…

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