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Posts Tagged ‘Cicero

“In photography there is a reality so subtle that it becomes more real than reality”*…

https://i1.wp.com/farm9.staticflickr.com/8478/8242458991_b4eebedba0_o.gif “Enough of symbolism and these escapist themes of purity and innocence.”    8½ (1963)

From If We Don’t, Remember Me, “a gallery of living movie stills”…

https://i1.wp.com/farm9.staticflickr.com/8487/8243529928_b21532dff4_o.gif “I just hate all these extroverted, obnoxious, pseudo-bohemian losers.”     Ghost World (2001)

* Alfred Stieglitz

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As we find our inner stillness, we might recall that it was on this date in 43 BCE that Rome’s greatest orator, Marcus Tullius Cicero was executed (his head and hands were amputated) for his Philippics, a series of speeches attacking Mark Antony and calling for a restoration of the Republic.  Sic semper prōtestor.

https://i0.wp.com/farm9.staticflickr.com/8478/8243527748_ab6d5f6fa9_o.jpg source

Written by LW

December 7, 2012 at 1:01 am

Brevity is the soul of wit…

 

Fifteen years ago, educator and humorist Eric Schulman wrote a “The History of the Universe in 200 Words or Less.”  It first appeared in the January/February 1997 issue of Annals of Improbable Research; since then, it has been translated into more than thirty languages:

Quantum fluctuation. Inflation. Expansion. Strong nuclear interaction. Particle-antiparticle annihilation. Deuterium and helium production. Density perturbations. Recombination. Blackbody radiation. Local contraction. Cluster formation. Reionization? Violent relaxation. Virialization. Biased galaxy formation? Turbulent fragmentation. Contraction. Ionization. Compression. Opaque hydrogen. Massive star formation. Deuterium ignition. Hydrogen fusion. Hydrogen depletion. Core contraction. Envelope expansion. Helium fusion. Carbon, oxygen, and silicon fusion. Iron production. Implosion. Supernova explosion. Metals injection. Star formation. Supernova explosions. Star formation. Condensation. Planetesimal accretion. Planetary differentiation. Crust solidification. Volatile gas expulsion. Water condensation. Water dissociation. Ozone production. Ultraviolet absorption. Photosynthetic unicellular organisms. Oxidation. Mutation. Natural selection and evolution. Respiration. Cell differentiation. Sexual reproduction. Fossilization. Land exploration. Dinosaur extinction. Mammal expansion. Glaciation. Homo sapiens manifestation. Animal domestication. Food surplus production. Civilization! Innovation. Exploration. Religion. Warring nations. Empire creation and destruction. Exploration. Colonization. Taxation without representation. Revolution. Constitution. Election. Expansion. Industrialization. Rebellion. Emancipation Proclamation. Invention. Mass production. Urbanization. Immigration. World conflagration. League of Nations. Suffrage extension. Depression. World conflagration. Fission explosions. United Nations. Space exploration. Assassinations. Lunar excursions. Resignation. Computerization. World Trade Organization. Terrorism. Internet expansion. Reunification. Dissolution. World-Wide Web creation. Composition. Extrapolation?

Shulman expanded the exercise into the short book pictured above, A Briefer History of Time (free download here)…  then contracted it again into a sixty-second video slideshow (on the NSF site, here).

Your correspondent has no doubt that readers would, with the benefit of the decade-and-a-half that has passed, revise the account…  but what a place to start!  And what a powerful demonstration of Cicero’s maxim (cribbed by Polonius/Shakespeare, as in the title of this post): “brevity is a great charm of eloquence”…

 

As we rally those red pencils, we might recall that it was on this date in 1934 that the first “All-American Soap Box Derby” was run in Dayton, Ohio.  (It moved to Akron the following year…)

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A Connecticut Yankee in King Agamemnon’s Court?…

Long-time (pre-blog) readers will remember the “Antikythera mechanism”…  In 1900, divers found the wreck of a Roman vessel off the Greek island of Antikythera.  Among the other treasures remanded to the Greek government was an unassuming corroded lump.  Some time later, the lump fell apart, revealing a damaged machine of unknown purpose, with some large gears and many smaller cogs, plus a few engraved words in Greek.  At last writing, it appeared to be some sort of astronomical time-keeping device…

Recent studies, using advanced imaging techniques have unlocked the story of the device– and what a story it is:  the rough equivalent of finding a fully-functional Ford buried in a medieval ruin.  As io9 reports:

The findings, published in Nature, are probably best described as “mind blowing.” Devices with this level of complexity were not seen again for almost 1,500 years, and the Antikythera mechanism’s compactness actually bests the later designs. Probably built around 150 B.C., the Antikythera mechanism can perform a number of functions just by turning a crank on the side.

Using nothing but an ingenious system of gears, the mechanism could be used to predict the month, day and hour of an eclipse, and even accounted for leap years. It could also predict the positions of the sun and moon against the zodiac, and has a gear train that turns a black and white stone to show the moon’s phase on a given date. It is possible that it could also show the astronomical positions of the planets known to the ancients: Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn.

The Antikythera mechanism wasn’t just a scientific tool – it also had a social purpose. The Greeks held major athletic competitions (such as the Olympics) every two or four years. A small dial within the Metonic dial showed the dates of these important events.

The true genius of the mechanism goes beyond even the complex calculations and craftsmanship of a mechanical calendar. For example, the ancients didn’t know that the moon has an elliptical orbit, so they didn’t know why it sometimes slowed or sped up as it moved through the zodiac. The mechanism’s creator used epicyclic gears, also known as planetary gears, with a “pin-and-slot” mechanism that mimicked this apparent shifting in the moon’s movement. This use of epicyclic gears is far ahead of what anyone suspected ancient technology was capable of. Scientific American has a two-part video about the mechanism and the imaging techniques used in the research.

It’s still unclear who built the extraordinary device.  Cicero’s writings link it to Archimedes, though he was dead by the time that this specimen was built.  Researchers theorize that the Antikythera mechanism may be based on an Archimedian design, and might have been built by a workshop carrying on his technological tradition.

But if the design was “industrialized” in that way, why has there never been another one found like it?  Perhaps it’s the consequence of the turmoil of the period.  Indeed, the upheavals of war and natural disasters over 2,000 years have probably caused us to lose many more works and wonders that we will simply have to keep trying to find.

Though this is April Fool’s Day, the Antikythera mechanism is absolutely for real.  More information here.

As we recalibrate our assumptions about antiquity, we might recall that it was on this date in 1891 that the William Wrigley Jr. Company was founded.  Originally focused and making and selling soap and baking powder, Wrigley included chewing gum with each can of baking powder.  As the gum’s popularity eclipsed that of the powder, the company shifted its focus; today it sells Juicy Fruit, Doublemint, and other sticky treats in over 180 countries (one of which is not Singapore, where the import and sale of any chewing gum that does not have explicit therapeutic purpose has been banned since 2004).

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It’s all Greeking to me…

Web page layout, employing Lorem Ipsum

Studies show that people asked to assess a page design will be distracted by the readable content of a page when looking at its layout. So designers and editors use “Greeking”– non-English text that has a more-or-less normal distribution of letters, as opposed to using “Content here, content here,” making it look like readable English.

But while the name is surely an allusions to the old saying “it’s all Greek to me,” the actual text usually employed is in fact Latin; more specifically, it’s “Lorem ipsum”:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Vestibulum malesuada aliquet tortor vitae mollis. Aliquam erat volutpat. Nulla justo neque, luctus a laoreet quis, auctor et libero. Aenean elementum consequat nisi id ullamcorper. Quisque quis bibendum sem. Nulla id dui tellus, a semper sapien. Mauris est eros, dapibus ut luctus ac, ultricies sed enim. Praesent molestie cursus neque at faucibus. Vestibulum non nisl ac mauris ultricies porttitor eu eget leo. Aliquam porttitor scelerisque arcu eu tempus. Pellentesque faucibus consectetur magna, non consequat erat molestie at. Praesent nisl mi, congue ac semper at, iaculis non felis. Curabitur laoreet mattis augue, id hendrerit lacus hendrerit quis.

While to those of us with rusty Latin it might appear random, it is in fact closely derived from sections 1.10.32 and 1.10.33 of De Finibus Bonorum et Malorum (The Extremes of Good and Evil) by Cicero, written in 45 BC, a treatise on the theory of ethics, very popular during the Renaissance. The first line of Lorem Ipsum, “Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet..”, is excerpted from a line in section 1.10.32.

While no one is quite sure who first chose it nor why, it’s been in regular use since the 16th Century.

One can generate one’s own passage (of essentially any length) here.

As we fire up Pagemaker, we might recall that it was on this date in 1884 America’s first roller coaster– or “switchback railroad,” as then it was known– began operating at Coney Island. (The “hot dog” had been invented, also at Coney Island, in 1867, and was thus available to trouble the stomachs of the very first coaster riders.)

source: Ultimate Roller Coaster

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