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Posts Tagged ‘Ted Hughes

“A serious and good philosophical work could be written consisting entirely of jokes”*…

 

Scene 3: whoops!

 

In an earlier post, I laid out a history of “banana peel” (and orange peel) humor, extending back to the early 1800s. Orange peel-slipping humor dates to at least 1817 and banana peel jokes to 1858.  Banana peel jokes were told on stage in 1890, and Vaudeville performers may have performed banana-slipping gags on stage in the early 1900s.

Peels on Film

When I wrote the earlier post, the earliest banana slipping gag on film that I found was from 1913.  As it turns out, however, the banana slipping gag was already so old and tired by 1912, that advice for aspiring screenwriters cautioned against using it for cheap laughs…

The history of the banana peel gag, at “Peels in Film, Song and Poetry.”

* Ludwig Wittgenstein

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As we watch our steps, we might recall that it was on this date in 1956, at a party in Cambridge, England, that Fulbright Scholar Sylvia Plath met poet Ted Hughes.

…the one man in the room who was as big as his poems, huge… I screamed in myself, thinking, Oh, to give myself crashing, fighting, to you.

Her wish was granted; they were married later that same year.  Plath killed herself, in London, in 1963, several weeks after The Bell Jar came out; in 1981 her Collected Poems (edited by Hughes, who oversaw her posthumous publications) won the Pulitzer Prize.

 source

Written by LW

February 26, 2015 at 1:01 am

Synesthesia…

 

British designer Christophe Gowans put himself to the task of imagining “if best-selling albums had been books instead”…

Many more pulpy pleasures at “The Record Books.”

[TotH to Paris Review]

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As we head for the library, we might recall that it was on this date in 1956, at a party in Cambridge, England, that Fulbright Scholar Sylvia Plath met poet Ted Hughes.

…the one man in the room who was as big as his poems, huge… I screamed in myself, thinking, Oh, to give myself crashing, fighting, to you.

Her wish was granted; they were married later that same year.  They didn’t make beautiful music together, but did each create a stream of powerfully-important books:  Plath killed herself, in London, in 1963, several weeks after The Bell Jar came out; in 1981 her Collected Poems (edited by Hughes, who oversaw her posthumous publications) won the Pulitzer Prize.  Hughes was himself a great success as a poet (and children’s writer). Critics regularly rank him as one of the best poets of his generation; he served as Britain’s Poet Laureate from 1984 until his death in 1998.

 source

 

 

Written by LW

February 25, 2013 at 1:01 am

Examining the text closely. Very closely…

From “Ryan,” B to the F, a Tumbler in which he examines– very closely examines– the novelization of the first of the three Back to the Future films, which was published in advance of the release of the movie…

PAGE ONE

If you were writing the first words of a novel version of Back to the Future, how would you do it?  Maybe you’d introduce the concept of time being important, like the film did with all them crazy clocks.  Maybe instead you’d introduce Marty and Doc, show who they are and what their relationship is.  Well, anyway, you’re totally wrong!

The correct answer is to KILL EVERYBODY…

Read along– it gets even better– at B to the F…  [TotH to the always-illuminating Pop Loser]

 

As we explore the frontiers of editorial license, we might recall that it was on this date in 1956, at a party in Cambridge, England, that Fulbright Scholar Sylvia Plath met poet Ted Hughes.

…the one man in the room who was as big as his poems, huge… I screamed in myself, thinking, Oh, to give myself crashing, fighting, to you.

Her wish was granted; they were married later that same year.  Plath killed herself, in London, in 1963, several weeks after The Bell Jar came out; in 1981 her Collected Poems (edited by Hughes, who oversaw her posthumous publications) won the Pulitzer Prize.

 source

Written by LW

February 26, 2012 at 1:01 am

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