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Posts Tagged ‘National League

“Altering life by holding it still”*…

 

The first of a series of multimedia essays on photography and photojournalism; quoth Leica…

Building on their shared history, Magnum and Leica agreed to collaborate on a series of projects that continue their longstanding dedication to independent documentary photography. Beginning in the spring of 2011, Leica will sponsor the creation of a series of independently-produced multimedia essays that will highlight the personal journeys and insatiable curiosity of Magnum photographers. The stories will be published at the homepages of Magnum Photos, LFI Magazine, and Leica.

And for readers who are inspired, some riveting advice from the extraordinary Arthur Fellig, better known as Weegee, the photo-documentarian of the underside of New York life in the 30s, 40s, and 50s…

* “Photography takes an instant out of time, altering life by holding it still”- Dorothea Lange

 

As we adjust our f-stops, we might recall that it was on this date in 1947 that player-manager Mel Ott of the (then New York) Giants hit his 511th and final career home run.  Ott, the first National League player to hit 500 home runs, managed the Giants from 1942-48, during which stretch the Giant’s best finish was 3rd place.  It was in refeence to Ott’s easy-going stewardship of the Giants that then-Dodgers manager Leo Durocher made his oft-quoted (albeit somewhat out-of-context) remark, “Nice guys finish last!”

Baseball card on which Ott struck an uncharacteristically-fierce pose (source)

 

 

And a side of Bacon…

From the Spring, 2010 issue of Lapham’s Quarterly (“Arts and Letters”), “Friends, Lovers, and Family,” a plot of the “degrees of separation” among the creatives who have, among them, done so much to define the canon of English arts and letters…

An excerpt from the chart:

See the whole thing here…  and rest assured that it does, finally, resolve to Kevin Bacon.

As we revisit our Facebook friends lists, we might recall that it was on this date in 1939 that the Baseball Hall of Fame was dedicated and opened in Cooperstown, NY.

Stephen C. Clark, a local hotel owner, was the champion of the effort to build the Hall in Cooperstown.  He was anxious to boost the local economy, which was suffering economically, as the Great Depression had significantly reduced the local tourist trade, and Prohibition had devastated the local hops industry. He played heavily on the erroneous assertion that U.S. Civil War hero Abner Doubleday had invented baseball in Cooperstown, a claim made by former National League president Abraham G. Mills and his 1905 Mills Commission.  His grand-daughter, Jane Forbes Clark, currently serves as Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Hall of Fame.

(Readers should note that Cooperstown is by no means a one trick pony:  it is also home to The Farmers’ Museum, The Fenimore Art Museum, Glimmerglass Opera, and the New York State Historical Association.)

Plaques honoring Ty Cobb, Babe Ruth, Honus Wagner, Christy Mathewson and Walter Johnson, the first class of Inductees (named before the Hall itself was complete)

It may be a “guy thing,” still…

Your correspondent is no particular fan of the Dallas Cowboys.  Still, he is grateful to Jerry Jones and the boys for sharing this remarkable “inside” video of the old stadium coming down:

Click on the image, or here

External views of the demolition, here.

As we duck to avoid the score board in the Cowboys’ new stadium, we might recall that it was on this date in 1965 that the “Say Hey Kid,” Willie Mays, set the National League Home Run Record.  May’s 512th career home run broke (with sweet irony, famous Dodger) Mel Ott’s League record.  Mays finished his career with 660 home runs– third on the all-time list at the time of his retirement.

Probably the greatest all-around player of all time

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