(Roughly) Daily

Posts Tagged ‘David Foster Wallace

“The truth will set you free. But not until it is finished with you”*…

 

p. 409. Clipperton plays tennis with the Glock 17 held steadily to his head

How to get an 11-year-old interested in the works of David Foster Wallace? Crack out your copy of Infinite Jest, and recreate it in Lego. That was the project embarked upon back in April by American English professor Kevin Griffith and his 11-year-old son Sebastian. They’ve just finished, and – running to more than 100 scenes, as I guess any recreation of a 1,000-plus page novel would have to – it’s something of a masterpiece. It certainly puts these Lego scenes of classic literature to shame.

Griffith and his son had the idea to “translate” Infinite Jest into Lego after reading Brendan Powell Smith’s The Brick Bible, which takes on the New Testament. “Wallace’s novel is probably the only contemporary text to offer a similar challenge to artists working in the medium of Lego”…

Read the more at “David Foster Wallace novel translated by an 11-year-old – into Lego,” and see more at at the Griffiths’ web site, Brickjest.

* David Foster Wallace, Infinite Jest

###

As we piece it all together, we might send transformational birthday greetings to Paul Goodman; he was born on this date in 1911.  A man of many parts, Goodman earned a PhD in literature from the University of Chicago, where he taught until he was fired for insisting on his rights openly to avow his bisexuality and to fall in love with his students.  He went on to become a novelist, playwright, lay therapist (he co-founded the Gestalt Therapy movement), social critic, anarchist philosopher, and public intellectual.  The author of dozens of books, he’s probably best remembered for Growing Up Absurd and The Community of Scholars.  Part of the group known as “the New York intellectuals” (which included Daniel Bell, Norman Mailer, Irving Howe, Alfred Kazin, Norman Podhoretz, Mary McCarthy, Lionel Trilling, and Philip Rahv) he was a regular contributor to PoliticsPartisan Review, The New Republic, Commentary, The New Leader, Dissent and The New York Review of Books. 

Any page of Paul Goodman will give you not only originality and brilliance but wisdom – that is, something to think about. He is our peculiar, urban, twentieth-century Thoreau, the quintessential American mind of our time.

Hayden Carruth

 source

 

Written by LW

September 9, 2014 at 1:01 am

Doodle-doodle-do…

Sometimes in moments of distraction; sometimes, idleness…  we all do it: doodle.  Lest one feel at all self-conscious about it, our friends at Flavorwire have collected “Idle Doodles by Famous Authors“…

Notes on tango, Jorge Luis Borges (via  Notre Dame University)

Borges’ self-portrait (after he went blind)

Readers can find the casual jottings of Sylvia Plath, Kurt Vonnegut, Franz Kafka, Vladimir Nabakov, David Foster Wallace, and others at “Idle Doodles by Famous Authors.”

As we refill our pens, we might recall that it was on this date in 1888 that Walt Whitman put marginalia to a different use: he sent a sheet of inked emendations to the editors of The Riverside Literature Series No. 32 calling attention to mistakes in their recently-printed version of his poem, “O Captain! My Captain!” “Somehow you have got a couple of bad perversions in ‘O Captain,'” he wrote. “I send you a corrected sheet.”

source: Library of Congress

Nouvelle Vague for the New Millennium…

Click here to download Jean-Luc Godard’s latest (and last?) film, Film Socialisme, in its entirety (and entirely legally).  Quoth novelist James Greer (repeating Howard Rodman), it’s “kind of like David Foster Wallace’s cruise ship essay, but in French, and with a lot of quotations thrown in. Win/win/win!”

As we try to remember which one is Jim, and which one Jules, we might recall that it was on this date in 1949 that George Orwell published his masterpiece of dystopian literature, Nineteen Eighty-Four, and introduced terms like “Big Brother,” “doublethink,” “thoughtcrime,” “Newspeak,” and “Memory hole” into the vernacular.

Cover of the first British edition

%d bloggers like this: