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Posts Tagged ‘Charles Dickens

Take two aspirin, hop down the chimney, and call me in the morning…

From the British Medical Journal, Christmas Edition:

Guidance from the General Medical Council recommends that doctors should not disclose confidential patient information, even to rectify false assertions made by the patient or others in the press. There may be occasions, however, when disclosure “in the public interest” is appropriate. On this basis, with the informed consent of the patient, and after discussion with respected colleagues and my defence union, I would like to set the record straight.

Father Christmas (FC) registered as a patient with Stirchley Medical Practice in 1991, using the name Nicholas S Claus. His relationship with GPs and staff has been, for much of the past 20 years, somewhat tense, but despite his repeated threats to leave our list, we have managed to maintain engagement with him.

He has not been the easiest of patients to deal with…

Read the delightful details in “Primary Care: Reflections of Father Christmas’s GP,” and check out the other articles in this special issue.

As we’re grateful that April Fool’s Day doesn’t come only on April Fool’s Day, we might recall that it was on this date in 1843 that Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol— a novella he’d written over the prior six weeks– was formally published; it was released to book stores and the public two days later.  The first run of 6,000 copies sold out by Christmas Eve, and the book continued to sell well through twenty-four editions in its original form.

Cover of the first edition

 

It’s a Bard! it’s a plain (Jane)! It’s…

Literary Action Figures!  Shakespeare, Ms. Austen, plus Oscar Wilde, Edgar Allan Poe, and Charles Dickens

Order now, and as a special bonus receive:

(TotH to Brainpickings)

As we save up our allowance, we might recall that it was on this date in 1881 that Charles Darwin published The Formation of Vegetable Mould Through the Action of Worms-– the work he considered a more important accomplishment than The Origin of Species (1859).

source

What’s in a name?…

Mr. and Mrs. Mantalini in Ralph Nickleby’s Office (source: Charles Dickens Page)

From Paul Toutonghi, a list of businessmen’s names from Dickens— the absolute master of the onomatopoeic insult:

Nickleby

Hawk

Squeers

Gride

Quilp

Gradgrind

Tigg

Pecksniff

Heep

Smallweed

Krook

Merdle

Flintwich

Casby

Fledgeby

Wegg

Hexam

Next?  Perhaps lawyers?   (Jaggers, Vholes, Tulkinghorn, Grewgious, Grimwig… )

As we thank our forebears for our family names, we might recall that it was on this date in 1817 that the New York Stock Exchange came in out of the cold.  The origin of the Exchange dated back to May 17, 1792, when the Buttonwood Agreement was signed by 24 stock brokers outside of 68 Wall Street (under a buttonwood tree). Then, on March 8, 1817, the organization drafted a constitution, renamed itself the “New York Stock & Exchange Board,” and moved into a rented room down the road at 40 Wall Street.  (Today, the trading floor– one the NYSE’s several exchanges– is at 11 Wall Street.)

Traders at work under the buttonwood tree

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