(Roughly) Daily

“It’s really hard to imagine there ever being the kind of impact there was when punk rock happened in the late 70’s”*…

 

The late 1970s pulsated with an electric energy. Conceptual art and interdisciplinary art replaced Minimal Art. Rock musicians and artists alike were graduating from art schools. Painters were making films. Writers were doing performance art. Sculptors were doing installations. Artists were acting in films, making music and collaborating with each other.

It was in this milieu that I taught photography at Queens College and NYU by day and went out every night to hear music at CBGB’s, Max’s and the Mudd Club, which was also a venue for various artistic events, film showings, readings and theme parties. Guilty at spending so much time in clubs, I convinced myself that my photographic forays into the night, were my art. After taking candid pictures backstage or in dressing rooms at clubs, I would often invite people to my studio for photo sessions where atmosphere could be generated, lighting could be manipulated and props could be employed. My work with the Soho Weekly News, New York Magazine and other periodicals gave me access to photograph people who were well known in the popular culture…

Photographer Marcia Resnick recalls her career, and explains the story behind her new book:

More bad boys (and girls) on Resnick’s site.

* “It’s really hard to imagine there ever being the kind of impact there was when punk rock happened in the late 70’s. I wish there would be one big change like that again, but I don’t know if that’ll ever happen.”  – Penelope Spheeris

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As we strike a pose, we might send tuneful birthday greetings to Barry Mann; he was born on this date in 1939.  With his wife, Cynthia Weil, Mann wrote scores of hit songs including “On Broadway” for the Drifters, “You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feeling” and “(You’re My) Soul And Inspiration” for the Righteous Brothers, “Kicks” and “Hungry” for Paul Revere & the Raiders, “We’ve Gotta’ Get Out Of This Place” for the Animals, “Walkin’ In The Rain” for the Ronettes, and “Blame It On The Bossa Nova” for Eydie Gorme,  Mann and Weil are members of both the Songwriters and the Rock and Roll Halls of Fame.

Barry Mann, Cynthia Weil, and fellow-tunesmith Carole King (whose birthday is also today)

source

 

Written by LW

February 9, 2016 at 1:01 am

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