(Roughly) Daily

Posts Tagged ‘U.S. Grant

“Those in power must spend a lot of their time laughing at us”*…

 

LittleSis— the opposite of Big Brother–is a free database of who-knows-who at the heights of business and government.

It’s a kind of “involuntary Facebook of the 1%”…

We’re a grassroots watchdog network connecting the dots between the world’s most powerful people and organizations…  We bring transparency to influential social networks by tracking the key relationships of politicians, business leaders, lobbyists, financiers, and their affiliated institutions. We help answer questions such as:

  • Who do the wealthiest Americans donate their money to?
  • Where did White House officials work before they were appointed?
  • Which lobbyists are married to politicians? Who do they lobby for?

All of this information is public, but scattered. We bring it together in one place. Our data derives from government filings, news articles, and other reputable sources. Some data sets are updated automatically; the rest is filled in by our user community.

The database is large; at this writing:

And as the explanation above suggests, it’s growing.

Readers might do well to browse.  If, as a recent Princeton study suggests, the U.S. is no longer a democracy, but an oligarchy, it’d be wise to meet the new bosses.

* Alice Walker

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As we contemplate cronyism, we might recall that it was on this date in 1884 that the brokerage firm of Grant & Ward, in which former President Ulysses S. Grant was a partner, failed under the weight of $16,725,466 worth of debts.  The firm, founded in 1881, had done well at first, bolstered by the salesmanship of Ferdinand Ward– “The Young Napoleon of Finance”– and by Grant’s name.  The former president bragged to friends that he was worth two and a half million dollars, and family members and friends poured money into the firm.  But Grant was largely disengaged from the company’s business (he later argued in his autobiography), often signing papers without reading them.  In the event, it turned out that Ward was running a Ponzi scheme (before Ponzi had given the technique its name).  Ward was eventually convicted of fraud and served six years at Sing Sing.  Grant was financially ruined, but was bailed out by William Henry Vanderbilt, who paid off Grant’s debts, and by Mark Twain, whose generous offer for Grant’s autobiography financed the ex-President’s final years.

Frederick Opper’s treatment of “Young Napoleon” Ward, published during Ward’s trial

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Written by (Roughly) Daily

May 6, 2014 at 1:01 am

By any other name…

 

General Order Number Eleven was short. Three items were wrapped into one edict. It read:

  1. The Jews, as a class violating every regulation of trade established by the Treasury Department and also department orders, are hereby expelled from the Department within twenty-four hours from the receipt of this order.
  2. Post commanders will see to it that all of this class of people be furnished passes and required to leave, and any one returning after such notification will be arrested and held in confinement until an opportunity occurs of sending them out as prisoners, unless furnished with permit from headquarters.
  3. No passes will be given these people to visit headquarters for the purpose of making personal application of trade permits.

In short, “no Jews allowed,” effective nearly immediately.

But the “Department” wasn’t a section of Nazi-controlled Europe or Inquisition-era Spain. The edict wasn’t issued by Adolf Hitler. It was issued by Ulysses S. Grant, who would later be President of the United States. The year was 1862, and the “Department” was the “Department of Tennessee,” an area consisting of western Tennessee, western Kentucky, and northern Mississippi.

Read the whole sordid story at “General Order Number Eleven.”

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As we wince at realization that Twain was right that “history doesn’t repeat itself, but it rhymes,” we might recall that it was on this date in 1925 that Adolf Hitler’s Mein Kampf was published (Volume One; the second volume followed the next year).  Part autobiography and part political philosophy– an announcement of his hatred of what he believed to be the world’s twin evils: Communism and Judaism– Mein Kampf was begun as dictation while Hitler was imprisoned for what he considered the “political crime” of his failed 1923 Munich Putsch.  It sold 228,000 copies between 1925 and 1932, and one million copies in 1933, Hitler’s first year in office.

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Written by (Roughly) Daily

July 18, 2013 at 1:01 am

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