(Roughly) Daily

“It is more important to click with people than to click the shutter”*…

 

Hendrix

Jimi Hendrix lighting his guitar on fire at Monterey Pop Festival, in Monterey, California, in 1967

 

Few photographers have had a life and career as historic as Jim Marshall. His pictures not only capture some of the most influential artists of the 20th century but also established a new level of intimacy in the relationship between entertainers and the photojournalists documenting them.

Some of the most iconic pictures ever made of artists like Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, the Beatles, and Bob Dylan, to name a few, were captured through Marshall’s camera lens. His ability to level these larger-than-life musicians as normal human beings, coupled with his uncanny knack to find himself at the right place at the right time, established him as one of the era’s most sought-after music photographers. Whether it was the legendary Miles Davis or simply the neighborhood children playing stickball in the street, Marshall was able to capture the moment with striking humanity.

Marshall died in 2010 at the age of 74, leaving his entire archive of millions of photographs and negatives to his personal assistant of many years, Amelia Davis. This year, a new documentary about his life and the accompanying book, Jim Marshall: Show Me the Picture, chronicle the photographer’s journey through some of the most influential cultural events of the 20th century…

cash

Johnny Cash “giving one to the warden” at San Quentin State Prison in San Quenton, California, in 1969

dead

The Grateful Dead’s last free concert on Haight Street, in San Francisco, before they moved to Marin County, 1968

 

An interview with Davis– and more of Marshall’s marvelous work– at “23 Of The Most Influential Pictures From Music History.”  Even more of Marshall’s work at Marshall’s official website.

Vaguely related: facing rising San Francisco rent, the world’s largest collection of punk records and Maximum Rocknroll, the anti-establishment music magazine that safeguards it, must find a new home: “Eight tons of punk.”

* Alfred Eisenstaedt

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As we bask in backstage access, we might recall that it was on this date in 1956 that Bill Haley tied Ruby Murray’s record (set in 1955) when he scored five songs in the UK Top 30: “See You Later, Alligator” (#19), “Razzle Dazzle” (#17), “Rock Around The Clock” (#13), “The Saints Rock ‘n’ Roll” (#11), and “Rockin’ Through The Rye” (#4).

haley source

 

 

 

Written by LW

September 29, 2019 at 1:01 am

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