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Posts Tagged ‘opiates

“Opium teaches only one thing, which is that aside from physical suffering, there is nothing real”*…

 

Opium’s history in the United States is as old as the nation itself. During the American Revolution, the Continental and British armies used opium to treat sick and wounded soldiers. Benjamin Franklin took opium late in life to cope with severe pain from a bladder stone. A doctor gave laudanum, a tincture of opium mixed with alcohol, to Alexander Hamilton after his fatal duel with Aaron Burr.

By 1895, morphine and opium powders, like OxyContin and other prescription opioids today, had led to an addiction epidemic that affected roughly 1 in 200 Americans. Before 1900, the typical opiate addict in America was an upper-class or middle-class white woman. Today, doctors are re-learning lessons their predecessors learned more than a lifetime ago…

Doctors then, as now, overprescribed the painkiller to patients in need; and then, as now, government policy had a distinct bias.  Learn more at: “Inside the Story of America’s 19th-Century Opiate Addiction.”

* Andre Malraux

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As we moderate our intake, we might send insightful birthday greetings to Norman Rufus Colin Cohn; he was born on this date in 1915.  A historian of fanaticism, his remarkable The Pursuit of the Millennium, a tracing back of the mythologies associated with medieval apocalyptic movements that characterized– and ultimately marred– the revolutionary movements of the 20th century, was ranked as one of the 100 most influential books of the 20th century in a survey conducted by The Times Literary Supplement.  He was a Fellow of the British Academy, an honor to which he was nominated by Isaiah Berlin.

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Written by LW

January 12, 2018 at 1:01 am

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