(Roughly) Daily

Tap, tap, tap…

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-.. . .- .-. / .-. . .- -.. . .-. –..– / -.– — ..- / -.-. .- -. / -.. — / – …. .. … / -.– — ..- .-. … . .-.. ..-. –..– / .- – / – …. The Morse Code Translator.

As we flex our fingers, we might recall that it was on this date in 1955 that U.S. Customs confiscated 520 copies of Allen Ginsberg’s book Howl, arriving in the U.S. from England, where they’d been printed, on the grounds that the poem was obscenity.  San Francisco’s own City Lights, led by poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti, proceeded to publish the book domestically in the fall of 1956, leading to to Ferlinghetti’s arrest on obscenity charges.  Ferlinghetti was bailed out and defended by the American Civil Liberties Union, which fielded nine literary experts to testify that the poem was not obscene… Ferlinghetti was found not guilty, and Howl– both the poem and the tumult surrounding it– became a cornerstone of the counterculture…

source: Bookride

Written by LW

March 25, 2009 at 1:01 am

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