(Roughly) Daily

Posts Tagged ‘spam

Up, Up, and Away!…

Japanese photographer Natsumi Hayashi uses her blog, Yowayowa Camera Woman, to post her wonderfully whimsical series of self-portraits… in each of which she is levitating.  (Explanation of the technique involved, here.)

[TotH to Kottke.org]

As we feel ourselves rising, we might spare a sweet thought for Aaron “Bunny” Lapin; he died on this date in 1999.  In 1948, Lapin invented Reddi-Wip, the pioneering whipped cream dessert topping dispensed from a spray can.   First sold by milkmen in St. Louis, the product rode the post-World War Two convenience craze to national success; in 1998, it was named by Time one of the century’s “100 great consumer items”– along with the pop-top can and Spam.  Lapin became known as the Whipped Cream King; but his legacy is broader:  in 1955, he patented a special valve to control the flow of Reddi-Wip from the can, and formed The Clayton Corporation to manufacture it.  Reddi-Wip is now a Con-Agra brand; but Clayton goes strong, now also making industrial valves, closures, caulk, adhesives and foamed plastic products (like insulation and cushioning materials).

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The Quest for Verisimilitude…

Brandalism:  Any advertisement in public space that gives you no choice whether you see it or not is yours. It belongs to you. It’s yours to take, rearrange and re-use. Asking for permission is like asking to keep a rock someone just threw at your head.”
— Banksy (Wall and Piece)

The good folks at Behance pondered the ways that familiar logos might be revised better to reflect their subject’s essence…

More at “Honest Logos.”

As we wonder if it can be printed on a tee shirt, we might recall that it was on this date in 1864 that the first instance of mass unsolicited electronic commercial communication occurred.  As The Economist recounts: “several British politicians were disturbed by a knock at the door and the delivery of a telegram—a most unusual occurrence at such a late hour.  Had war broken out?  Had the queen been taken ill?  They ripped open the envelopes and were surprised to find a message relating not to some national calamity, but to dentistry. Messrs Gabriel, of 27 Harley Street, advised that their dental practice would be open from 10am to 5pm until October. Infuriated, some of the recipients of this unsolicited message wrote to the Times. ‘I have never had any dealings with Messrs Gabriel,’ thundered one of them, ‘and beg to know by what right do they disturb me by a telegram which is simply the medium of advertisement?’  The Times helpfully reprinted the offending telegram, providing its senders with further free publicity.  This was, notes Matthew Sweet, a historian, the first example of what is known today as ‘spam’.”

Written by LW

May 10, 2011 at 1:01 am

The Journal of Unintended Connotations, Canadian Edition…

To be perfectly blunt about it, The Beaver was an impediment on the Internet. People were literally writing us and saying, ‘We can’t get your e-newsletter because it’s being spam-filtered out, can you change the title of the heading?’ … There were some really unfortunate but practical reasons why The Beaver couldn’t be the universal brand. That’s the factor why it was a deterrent — particularly amongst women and people under the age of 45. Unfortunately, sometimes words take on an identity that wasn’t intended in 1920, when it was all about the fur trade.

Deborah Morrison, president of Canada’s National History Society, explains why The Beaver, Canada’s second-oldest history magazine has decided to change its name to the more straightforward Canada’s History.  (TotH to GMSV)

As we listen for naughty echoes, we might rejoice that it was on this date in 1605 that El Ingenioso Hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha ( or The Ingenious Hidalgo Don Quixote of La Mancha– aka Don Quixote), the masterwork of Miguel de Cervantes (and of the Spanish Golden Age) was first published.

Original title page

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