(Roughly) Daily

Posts Tagged ‘propaganda

“Childhood is the sleep of reason”*…

 

Scene of a “crèche”– an industrial day care center– with a productive factory in the background.

The images above and below, originally printed in 1930, reflect the government’s promotion of early-childhood health and well-being in the early years of the Soviet Union. The London School of Economics Library has collected a group of these posters—half brightly-colored, half sepia-toned—in a Flickr set.

In her book about childhood in Russia during the early Soviet period, historian Lisa Kirschenbaum writes that children and childhood were ideologically important to those involved in the Bolshevik Revolution. Children had the potential to grow into ideal communists, and communal early childhood education was seen as a good way of getting all members of the rising generation to hold consistent views. (In the United States, the conservative opposition to attempts to institute government support for day care in the early 1970s often referred, obliquely or explicitly, to the communalism of Soviet child care.)

By 1930, when these images were produced, the government-supported day care (or “crèche”) was doubly politically important, since young mothers were encouraged to work. In these posters, babies that look to be about 6 months old cry “I’m bored at home!” and beg to be taken to the crèche.

L: “I’m bored at home!” R: “I’m happy in the crèche!”

More– from “how to hold a baby” to “preparation of juice from raw fruits”– at the ever-illuminating Rebecca Onion’s “Government Child Care Advice From Early Soviet Propaganda Posters.”

* Jean-Jacques Rousseau

###

As we crib up on cribs, we might recall that it was on this date in 1889 that an estimated 3,000 spectators boarded special trains for a secret location, which turned out to be Richburg, a town just south of Hattiesburg, Mississippi, to attend the Heavyweight Boxing Championship match between defender John L. Sullivan and challenger Jake Kilrain.  The fight began at 10:30 p.m.; early on, it appeared that Sullivan would lose (especially after he vomited during the 44th round). But the champion got his second wind after that, and Kilrain’s manager finally threw in the towel after the 75th round.  The match was the last world title bout fought under the London Prize Ring Rules– and thus, the last bare-knuckle heavyweight title bout.  And it was one of the first American sporting events to receive national press coverage.

John L. Sullivan (L) and Jake Kilrain

 

 

Written by LW

July 8, 2014 at 1:01 am

Maps that make a point…

More amusing maps-as-propaganda at La Boite Verte.

[TotH to EWW's friend AH]

***

As we remember that the map is not the territory, we might send bellicose birthday wishes to Donald Henry Rumsfeld; he was born on this date in 1932.  A successful businessman, Rumsfeld served as U.S. Secretary of Defense twice, first under Gerald Ford, then under George W. Bush.  Early in that latter tour, as the groundwork was being laid for the invasion of Iraq, he remarked:

…there are no “knowns.” There are things we know that we know. There are known unknowns. That is to say there are things that we now know we don’t know. But there are also unknown unknowns. There are things we do not know we don’t know… the absence of evidence is not evidence of absence

(NATO press conference, June 6, 2002)

Then several months later,

I can’t tell you if the use of force in Iraq today would last five days, or five weeks, or five months, but it certainly isn’t going to last any longer than that.

(CBS Radio interview, November 14, 2002)

Then a few month later still,

We know where they [Iraq's WMD] are. They’re in the area around Tikrit and Baghdad and east, west, south, and north somewhat…

(in an interview with George Stephanopoulos on ABC News, March 30, 2003)

Though two years later (November 20, 2005), on a return visit to Stephanopoulos’s show, Rumsfeld suggested,

I didn’t advocate invasion…I wasn’t asked.

Interestingly, it was also on this date (in 1962) that Bob Dylan recoded “Blowin’ in the Wind”

How many times must a man look up
Before he can see the sky?
Yes, ‘n’ how many ears must one man have
Before he can hear people cry?
Yes, ‘n’ how many deaths will it take till he knows
That too many people have died?
The answer, my friend, is blowin’ in the wind,
The answer is blowin’ in the wind.

 source

Written by LW

July 9, 2012 at 1:01 am

Keep Calm and Carry On…

Readers will recall (from pre-blog days) war posters reissued and (more recently) war posters updated.  Now reader AW alerts us to war posters updated and made available on one’s choice of mug, tee shirt, or refrigerator magnet; e.g.,…

See the full range, created by The Propaganda Remix Project, here.

As we remember that the medium is the message, we might recall that on this date in 1776, the Declaration of Independence was read aloud in Philadelphia; and the Liberty Bell, rung.

Bell, cracked

Not fighting the last war…

From Brian Lane Winfield Moore, inspirational updates of classic war posters– propaganda for the new millennium!

See Norman Rockwell’s original here… and see Brian’s full set here.


As we feel the stirrings of a sense of duty
, we might recall that on this date in 1941, NBC broadcast the first TV commercial to be sanctioned by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).  The appearance of illegal ads on stations earlier in the year had moved the FCC to act; they began licensing commercial television stations in May 1941, granting the first license to NBC.  During a Dodgers-Phillies game that was broadcast July 1, NBC pulled the trigger on its newly-acquired right, and ran its first commercial– for which the first legitimate television advertiser, Bulova, paid $4.

The first (legal) television commercial (source: MobHappy)

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