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Posts Tagged ‘Periodic Table of Typefaces

Period, Full Start…

Computersherpa at DeviantART has taken the collected wisdom at TV Tropes and that site’s “Story Idea Generator” and organized them into an amazing Periodic Table of Storytelling

click here (and again) for a larger image

[TotH to Brainpickings]

Along these same lines, readers might also be interested in the “Perpetual Notion Machine” (which includes, as a bonus, the story of Dmitri Mendeleev and the “real” Periodic Table…)  See also the Periodic Table of Typefaces (“‘There are now about as many different varieties of letters as there are different kinds of fools…’“) and the Periodic Table of Visualization Methods (“Now See Here…“).

As we constructively stack our writers’ blocks, we might wish a thoughtful Happy Birthday to Immanuel Kant; he was born on this date in 1724 in Königsberg, Prussia (which is now Kaliningrad, Russia).  Kant is of course celebrated as a philosopher, the author of Critique of Pure Reason (1781), Critique of Practical Reason (1788), and Critique of Judgment (1790), and father of German Idealism (et al.).

But less well remembered are the contributions he made to science, perhaps especially to astronomy, before turning fully to philosophy.  For example, his General History of Nature and Theory of the Heavens (1755) contained three anticipations important to the field: 1) Kant made the nebula hypothesis ahead of Laplace. 2) He described the Milky Way as a lens-shaped collection of stars that represented only one of many “island universes,” later shown by Herschel. 3) He suggested that friction from tides slowed the rotation of the earth, which was confirmed a century later.  Similarly, Kant’s writings on mathematics were cited as an important influence by Einstein.

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Now see here…

Readers know that your correspondent is intrigued (OK, to the point of obsessed) with data visualization.  Previous missives have featured hero examples (like this one and this one) and compelling collections (like Flowing Data and Information is Beautiful).  Readers will also recall that your correspondent has a soft spot for the periodic table (as, for instance, here, here, or of course here)…

Now, from Visual Literacy, a synthesis of the two–  “A Periodic Table of Visualization Methods“:

Mouse over any of the “elements” (on the original) to see to an example of the approach in question.  Very helpful…  and very cool!

Update to the Periodic Table of Typefaces: From Julian Hansen, a (very amusing) flow chart for picking the type style appropriate to any need.  And from Typography for Lawyers…  well, precisely that (replete with cautionary examples).

As we remind ourselves that our mothers were right, that appearances do matter, we might lay a particularly elegant wreath for Donald Deskey, who died on this date in 1989.  An inventor (e.g., the laminate Weldtex) and designer, Deskey championed Art Deco (he designed Radio City Music Hall, for instance) and probably did more than anyone else to make industrial design a profession (he was a founder of the American Society of Industrial Designers and of its predecessor, the American Union of Decorative Artists and Craftsmen).  His impact survives him; among his lasting designs:  the goose-necked street lamp that he designed for New York City…

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…and the Crest toothpaste tube, designed for Proctor and Gamble.

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Donald Deskey

“There are now about as many different varieties of letters as there are different kinds of fools”*…

From the web design house Squidspot,

The Periodic Table of Typefaces (click here for zoomable version)

* a quote from Eric Gill, the creator of, among other fonts, the redoubtable Gill Sans (on the chart above).

As we make an effort to be as careful in choosing our letters as we are our words, we might recall that it was on this date in 1633 that the formal inquest of Galileo Galilei by the Inquisition  began.  Readers will recall that two months later the Holy Office in Rome forced Galileo to recant his conclusion that the Sun, not the Earth, is the center of the Universe. Galileo is said to have muttered “Eppur si muove!” (“Yet, still, it moves!”).

Cristiano Banti’s 1857 painting, “Galileo facing the Roman Inquisition”

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