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Posts Tagged ‘Make

“My name is Max. My world is fire.”*…

 

The inspiration for this project was the Doof Warrior’s flamethrower guitar from Mad Max. Nothing says rock-n-roll more than actual fire entwined with your tunes!

I didn’t want to try to replicate exactly what he had, and I also wanted to scale things down to be marginally safer. This version can be built from hardware store parts in a very short amount of time…

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From Caleb Kraft and the marvelous Make. TotH to Bored Panda.

* Max Rockatansky, Mad Max: Fury Road

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As we fire ’em up, we might send glamorous birthday greetings to Luciana Paluzzi; she was born on this date in 1937.  An actress whose career began with an uncredited walk-on in Three Coins in the Fountain in 1954, she acted in dozens of films, mostly in Italy, until 1965, when she appeared in her best-known role, SPECTRE assassin Fiona Volpe in the fourth James Bond film, Thunderball.  A victim of the “Bond Girl curse,” her best-known role afterwards was probably a tangential turn in Muscle Beach Party.

Luciana Paluzzi/Fiona Volpe

 source

 

Written by LW

June 10, 2015 at 1:01 am

The essence of entrepreneuring…

From the Kauffman Foundation’s “Sketchbook” series, “Make it Happen,” a wonderful animation of a recent interview with Tim O’Reilly on the “Maker Movement” (see here and here)– and on what it can teach us about innovation and entrepreneurial energy:

 click image above, or here, for video

For more, see CNN’s interview with Make‘s founder (and Tim’s long-time publishing partner), Dale Dougherty.

As we return with enthusiasm to our workbenches, we might recall that it was on this date in 1872 that U.S. Patent No.123,790 was awarded to Silas Noble and James P. Cooley for a device that allowed “a block of wood, with little waste and in one operation, [to] be cut up in to toothpicks ready for use.”  The inventors had been working together since 1854, as drum makers; at the time of the toothpick breakthrough, their company , Noble and Cooley, which remains in the percussion business to this day, was manufacturing 100,000 drums per year.

So, in much the same way that an unplanned byproduct of NASA’s space program was the powdered drink that gave American households a convenient source of vitamin C (Tang), Noble and Cooley’s quest for better drum shells and sticks helped bring down the cost of cleaner teeth and healthier gums…

 source

Written by LW

February 20, 2012 at 1:01 am

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