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Posts Tagged ‘immigration

“I’m not afraid of death; I just don’t want to be there when it happens”*…

 

From Sunbelt seekers and snowbird retirees to economic immigrants and political refugees, folks flock to southern Florida.  And many of them chose to return home– if not during their lives, then afterwards…  So it’s no surprise that the Miami area is the U.S. capital of corpse repatriation:

The transnational city is a place to die for. Ironically, however, once established in the transnational city, few envision staying there until their last breath. For many, it is a temporary venue, whether as a place of exile, a springboard for upward mobility, or a playground until new opportunities beckon. Few imagine dying there and, as the moment draws near, many make plans to go home.

In the transnational city, which is home to a disproportionate number of the foreign-born and expatriates, death and repatriation are a steady business. The bodies of an estimated 20 percent of South Florida’s deceased are shipped out, more than from any other region in the USA. Most of the HRs (industry shorthand for human remains) going abroad depart from Miami International Airport. According to the CEO of Pierson, a leader in this business since 1964, around 80 percent of business is international, with the company shipping to a range of foreign destinations across Central and South America and a number of European countries as well…

Read more about this last arc in the circle of life (and find out what it costs) at “Miami Is the #1 Airport in America for Shipping Dead Foreigners.”

[TotH to friend PH for the pointer]

* Woody Allen

###

As we wonder if there’s a discount fare, we might recall that it was on this date in 1914 that “Little Willie,” the first prototype of the British Mark I tank– thus, the first completed tank prototype in the world– rolled out of the shop.  It weighed 14 tons, required rear steering wheels (so got stuck in trenches), and managed only two miles per hour; still, it was the first step toward a technology that revolutionized battlefields.

 source

 

Written by LW

September 6, 2014 at 1:01 am

Roots…

 click here or on the image above

From Bloomberg, an interactive graphic that allows readers to see and compare the heritages (as reported in the 2010 Census) of residents of the U.S. as whole and of each of the nation’s 3,143 counties.

(The example above was pulled at random… One notes that a “German heritage vs Mexican heritage” sort yields Maricopa County, Arizona– the precinct policed by brown-skin-busting, sexual-abuse-ignoring, vendetta-prosecuting “Sheriff Joe” Arpaio, the subject of a current Justice Department investigation– as the county in the U.S. with the most self-identified citizens of German heritage.  Chillingly weird.)

***

As we wonder if the “melting pot” has become a “fondue pot,” we might spare a thought for the first Mississippi field secretary of the NAACP, Medgar Evers; he was assassinated on this date in 1963 by Byron De La Beckwith, a member of the White Citizens’ Council.

A bullet from the back of a bush took Medgar Evers’ blood.
A finger fired the trigger to his name.
A handle hid out in the dark
A hand set the spark
Two eyes took the aim
Behind a man’s brain
But he can’t be blamed
He’s only a pawn in their game.

- Bob Dylan, ‘Only a Pawn in Their Game’

 source

OMG! The Easter Island heads have bodies!…

 

…so did they bury them complete with petroglyphs..(who would see them if they are buried?) or was it covered by something else that happened?

More (and another photo) at Follow the Money…  [TotH to the ever-illuminating Pop Loser]

 

As we man the monoliths, we might recall that it was on this date in 1954 that an island that was monumental in a different way– Ellis Island– closed…  having processed over 20 million immigrants to the U.S. since its opening in 1892.

The first Ellis Island station (source)

 

Written by LW

November 12, 2011 at 1:01 am

The Times They are A’Changin…

Come writers and critics
Who prophesize with your pen
And keep your eyes wide
The chance won’t come again
And don’t speak too soon
For the wheel’s still in spin
And there’s no tellin’ who
That it’s namin’
For the loser now
Will be later to win
For the times they are a-changin’

- Bob Dylan

Rebecca Black’s “Friday” has become a runaway sensation. As Kevin Rutherford, a columnist for Billboard, explained, “Black’s video for ‘Friday’ is one of those rare occurrences where even the most seasoned critics of Internet culture don’t know where to begin. From the singing straight out of Auto-Tuned hell to lyrics such as ‘Tomorrow is Saturday / And Sunday comes afterwards / I don’t want this weekend to end’ and a hilariously bad rap about passing school buses, ‘Friday’ is something that simply must be seen and heard to be fully appreciated.”

And “seen and heard” it has been, closing in on 34 million YouTube views at this writing– not counting the scores of parodies floating across the web.

Music industry exec Jay Frank captures the impact of a performance that has been called “bizarre,” “inept,” and “hilariously dreadful” with a set of a simple comparisons that illustrate the upending of the music business:

WINNER: REBECCA BLACK
As she’s shown on her Good Morning America interview, she is making lemons out of lemonades. Make no bones about it, this song is selling (reached Top 20 on iTunes) and is going to be a valuable copyright for years to come.

LOSER: EVERY SOUTH BY SOUTHWEST BAND
At my SxSW panel on Saturday, I did the math. If you combined every view of “Friday” and its parody videos, approximately 62 Million minutes were spent on this song. That’s presuming that, on average, the viewers only watched half the video. In the meantime, if the approximately 15,000 SxSW attendees watched 12 hours of music a day for all 5 days, that would only add up to 54 Million minutes spent watching music. All hopes of fame from Austin got upstaged by a 13 year old.

WINNER: YOUTUBE
Their ability for anyone to upload anything produces overnight successes like this. This attracts even more people to their platform. Also, this firmly makes them a broadcaster, probably more than any previous video. 21 million views in a week? That’s more than nearly EVERY show on TV (cable or broadcast) receives in a week INCLUDING the DVR play. The fact that they have also successfully conquered with mobile apps and IPTV just increases their reach.

LOSER: VEVO
The music industry’s supposed white knight got upstaged in a big way. Turns out quality (of the song or HD transmission) doesn’t matter. The viewer goes to what they want to see. Also, Rebecca Black got more views in 9 days of “Friday” than Lady Gaga’s “Born This Way” did in 3x the days. Lady Gaga’s a huge star. Her new video got massive blog pickup like “Friday.” It was also hugely promoted as an “exclusive” on the Vevo site. If “Friday” can beat all that, something is wrong with Vevo and there’s some explainin’ to do.

WINNER: NEW CHART METHODOLOGY
In Austin, I discussed with Eric Charland of Ultimate Chart about how high Rebecca Black will debut next week. With the numbers she’s had, it’s painfully obvious that this dominated the entire conversation. Quality of the song was irrelevant. Since it wasn’t in heavy rotation on pop radio, it likely won’t be at #1 on their chart, but it’ll properly debut high. This will give Ultimate Chart even more credibility on truly leading in identifying a song’s true popularity.

LOSER: THE ALBUM CHART
When the Soundscan Top 200 album chart is released on Wednesday, Adele will be battling a new album by Rise Against. Nothing against either artist, but this week the battle was Rebecca Black vs. everything else. If you use Google search as a gauge, there’s just no competition. The album chart has been irrelevant for quite some time. It no longer reflects our time. This should end the discussion and let’s focus on singles where the business IS rather than albums where the business WAS.

[TotH to Bob Lefsetz]

 

As we recall that unit sales of the best selling album of 2010 wouldn’t have made the Top Ten in 2000, we might recall that it was on this date in 1973 that U.S. Immigration authorities ordered John Lennon to leave the US within 60 days… thus beginning Lennon’s fight to acquire permanent residency, which he received in July of 1976.

John Lennon’s Green Card (source)

 

What’s in a (sur)name?…

From National Geographic:

for larger, interactive version, click on the image above, or here

A new view of the United States based on the distribution of common last names shows centuries of history and echoes some of America’s great immigration sagas. To compile this data, geographers at University College London used phone directories to find the predominant surnames in each state. Software then identified the probable provenances of the 181 names that emerged.

Many of these names came from Great Britain, reflecting the long head start the British had over many other settlers. The low diversity of names in parts of the British Isles also had an impact. Williams, for example, was a common name among Welsh immigrants—and is still among the top names in many American states.

But that’s not the only factor. Slaves often took their owners’ names, so about one in five Americans now named Smith are African American. In addition, many newcomers’ names were anglicized to ease assimilation. The map’s scale matters too. “If we did a map of New York like this,” says project member James Cheshire, “the diversity would be phenomenal”—a testament to that city’s role as a once-and-present gateway to America.

 

As we ruminate on roots, we might recall that it was on this date in 1654 that the Portuguese issued the Capitulation Protocol, giving Jewish and Dutch settlers three months to leave Brazil.  Approximately 150 Jewish families of Portuguese descent fled the Brazilian city of Recife, in the state of Pernambuco.  By September, twenty-three of these refugees had established the first community of Jews in New Amsterdam (now, of course, New York City).

These “Sephardim” (Jews of Spanish-Portuguese extraction) had followed a tortured path. In December 1496, following Ferdinand and Isabella’s Spanish example, King Manuel I of Portugal had expelled all Jews from Portugal, driving many to flee to more tolerant Holland.  From there, some migrated to Pernambuco, a colony of the Dutch West India Company in modern-day Brazil. That community flourished until the Dutch eventually surrendered Pernambuco to the Portuguese– and the Sephardim were again forced to flee.

After being driven ashore in Jamaica by Spanish ships, twenty-three members of the community, along with a group of Dutch Calvinists, made their way to New Netherland (New York)– another colony run by the Dutch West India Company.  Even then, the trials were not past: Peter Stuyvesant governor of New Netherland, feared that the indigent newcomers would burden the colony; but when he motioned to eject the Jewish newcomers, the Company (many of the shareholders of which were Jewish) refused his petition… and the wanderers found a home.

Accuratissima Brasiliæ tabula
[Inset of Pernambuco.]
by Hendrik Hondius, 1630
(source: Library of Congress)

 

Here she comes, Miss…

MISS LIBERTY AMERICA (sm) is dedicated to discovering America’s elite feminine patriots and giving them the opportunity on a national stage to showcase their patriotism, intelligence, talent, and beauty. The ultimate mission is to promote Liberty, the military, and the documents of our founding fathers.  The contestants will be judged in categories of personal interview, swimsuit, evening gown, beauty, talent, questions regarding the documents of America’s founding fathers, and  Marksmanship! This will be the first pageant of its kind to introduce competency in the handling, safety and use of firearms, and CPR!   The contestants must be able to save a life as well as defend one!

More on this incumbent pageant, scheduled to debut in 2012 (in Las Vegas) here.

UPDATE: Further to the almanac entry on Wednesday about the incarceration rate in the U.S., this NPR report on the way that the private prisons industry collaborated in the drafting of, then lobbied for/made campaign contributions in support of Arizona’s controversial immigration law. As the head of the largest private prison operator says in an excerpt of an analyst call that’s played in the piece, “those people coming across the border and getting caught are going to have to be detained and that for me, at least I think, there’s going to be enhanced opportunities for what we do.”  One might have thought that the recent revelations in Pennsylvania would stand as a cautionary example.

As we join Christine O’Donnell in boning up on the Constitution, we might celebrate some women who knew their stuff: it was on this date in 1966 that the meeting to create the National Organization for Women was convened in Washington, D.C.

NOW Organizing Conference, Oct. 29-30, 1966. Key to picture above: 1. Inez Casiano, NY, Community Activist, Program and Research; 2.Clara Wells, NY, Community Development Human Relations, Resources Committee; 3. Inka O’Hanrahan, CA, California Comm. Status of Women; 4. Alice Rossi, IL, Sociologist, University of Chicago; 5. Lucille Kapplinger, MI, Legal Assistant to Governor, Governors Commission; 6. Ruth Gober, WI, Academic; 7. Caruthers Berger, Washington, D.C., Attorney, U.S. Dept. of Labor; 8. Sonia Pressman, Washington, D.C., Attorney, EEOC; 9. Amy Robinson, IN, Governors Commission; UAW; 10. Betty Friedan, NY Author, The Feminine Mystique; 11. Morag Simchak, Washington, D.C., Equal Pay for Equal Work, U.S. Dept. of Labor; 12. Mary Esther Gauldin, TX, Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical School; 13. Dr. Pauli Murray, Washington, D.C. Poet, Attorney, EEOC Consultant; 14. Mary Eastwood, Washington, D.C. Attorney, U.S. Dept. of Justice; 15. Dr. Caroline Ware, VA, Consultant, U.N.; 16. Sister Mary Joel Read, WI, Alverno College; 17. Unidentified; 18. Dorothy Haener, MI, UAW, Women’s Department; 19. Unidentified; 20. Anna Arnold Hedgeman, NY, National Council of Churches; 21. Robert Gray; 22. Muriel Fox, NY, Carl Byoir & Associates; 23. Pat Perry Gray, Washington, D.C., Carl Byoir & Associates; 24. Colleen Boland, IL, President, Steward & Stewardesses of Airline Pilots Association; 25. Charlotte Roe, NY, Project Director, National Affairs Assoc. U.S. Youth Council.

Many more women and men were involved in the founding and early days of NOW, including: Ada Allness, Dr. Shepard Aronson, Dorothy Austin, Mary Benbow, Gene Boyer, Analoyce Clapp, Catherine Conroy, Claire Dalmond, Caroline Davis, Carl Degler, Sister Austin Doherty, Elizabeth Drews, Edith Finlayson, Betty Furness, Anna Roosevelt Halstead, Lorene Harrington, Jane Hart, Mary Lou Hill, Esther B. Johnson, Nancy Knaak, Rev. Dean Lewis, Min Matheson, Mabel McClanahan, Ollie Butler Moore, Helen Moreland, Ruth V. Murray, Grace Olivarez, Marjorie Palmer, Pauline Parish, Dr. Patricia Plante, Eve P. Purvis, Charlotte Roe, Edna Schwartz, Dr. Vera Schwartz, Mary Jane Snyder, Dr. Gretchen Squires, Betty Tarkington, Olla Werner, Herbert Wright.

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