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Posts Tagged ‘Cervantes

Been there, done that…

 

The Associated Press reported in early February 2009 that American Jennifer Figge had just completed a 2,100-mile swim across the Atlantic. The story reported that Figge had begun at Cape Verde, in western Africa—on January 12. It took little time for sharp-eyed readers to flinch, do a double take and read that again: January 12 to early February. Not even 30 days. That would have been 80 miles daily—three miles per hour nonstop for a month—to complete the journey…

Seem impossible?  It was.  Read the full story– and eight other “stretches”– at Smithsonian‘s “Cheating Their Way to Fame: The Top 9 Adventure Travel Hoaxes.”

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As we burnish our travel tales, we might spare a thought for the man who told what is arguably the most amazing (albeit avowedly fictional) travel tale of all, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra; he died on this date in 1616 (though some scholars put it a day earlier)– the same day as Shakespeare died, and (most likely) Shakespeare’s birthday.  As Somerset Maugham said,”casting my mind’s eye over the whole of fiction, the only absolutely original creation that I can think of is Don Quixote.”

 source

 

Written by LW

April 23, 2013 at 1:01 am

The Journal of Unintended Connotations, Canadian Edition…

To be perfectly blunt about it, The Beaver was an impediment on the Internet. People were literally writing us and saying, ‘We can’t get your e-newsletter because it’s being spam-filtered out, can you change the title of the heading?’ … There were some really unfortunate but practical reasons why The Beaver couldn’t be the universal brand. That’s the factor why it was a deterrent — particularly amongst women and people under the age of 45. Unfortunately, sometimes words take on an identity that wasn’t intended in 1920, when it was all about the fur trade.

Deborah Morrison, president of Canada’s National History Society, explains why The Beaver, Canada’s second-oldest history magazine has decided to change its name to the more straightforward Canada’s History.  (TotH to GMSV)

As we listen for naughty echoes, we might rejoice that it was on this date in 1605 that El Ingenioso Hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha ( or The Ingenious Hidalgo Don Quixote of La Mancha– aka Don Quixote), the masterwork of Miguel de Cervantes (and of the Spanish Golden Age) was first published.

Original title page

Photo-journal(ism)…

An old Colossal Pictures friend, Dan Hanna, has been pursuing an unusual project:

Every day I position myself in the center of this ring and take two simultaneous photos (180 degrees apart). The ring is marked off for the 365 days of the year and a pair of crosshairs (mounted on a sliding wooden fixture) are incremented along the circumference of the ring to line up with these markings. I use the crosshairs to position my head as nearly as possible in the center of the ring. So far, I’ve accumulated approximately 17 years worth of photos (the project was started in ’91).

See all 17 years worth of The Photo Aging Project here.  (Thanks, PR, for lead.)

As we check our hair and make-up, we might tilt at a birthday windmill in honor of Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, the author of Don Quixote; he was born on this date in 1547…  and we might marvel that what is arguably the first novel (in the Western canon, anyway) may also be the best.

Cervantes

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